Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

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Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Thu Nov 22, 2012 11:29 am

Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the BIGNAY, Antisdesma Bunius:

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)

This is both a very interesting and a very rare fruit with probably less than 200 in the entire United States. It produces a small berry with a flavor and size of a small blueberry. Its growth habits vary very widely and it can be anything from a small bush to a towering tree of over 40 feet. In the Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach, just off of Military Trail, there is a towering specimen of over 40 feet that all should go look at.

The Bignay is native to southeastern Asia, Malaya and western Australia. There is a tremendous variety with respect quality of fruit. Some being of such poor flavor as to be hardly fit for human consumption and others with excellent fruit that almost everyone would highly enjoy. The tree previously mentioned as growing in the the Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach produces some excellent fruit. [Note: the the Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach is open to the public, free of charge 6 days a week between 9:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. Eastern Standard Time, and I would recommend a visit there when ever you happen to be in south Florida].

Interestingly the fruit sets best on female trees that have not been pollinated; however, seeds from such fruit will not germinate. Propagation in the USA is done with air layers, cuttings, or graftings; I know of NO male trees in the USA.

The fruit, although rather small, makes a good drink, excellent jellies and jams and is very rich in vitamin C. The fruit is subacid and quite flavorful and is green when not ripe and jet black when ripe, and borne is large clusters. Most Bignays are quite prolific and produce in south Florida at least two crops per year. The tree, especially in bush form, is very attractive and pleasing to look at.

I even know of one person growing one in a heated sunroom in St. Paul, Minnesota, but I would NOT recommend it as a house plant for the north.

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Here is a Commentary on the Black Saporte, Diospyros Digyna, of the family Ebenaceae:

Post  Admin on Thu Nov 22, 2012 11:37 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on the Black Saporte, Diospyros Digyna, of the family Ebenaceae:

Genesis 1:29-30 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (American Standard Version)

The Black Saporte, Diospyros Digyna, is a handsome evergreen fruit tree, that produces a greenish-brown thin skined fruit that can be eaten fresh, but in my opinion is much better when used in baked goods. I know one German lady that makes the most tasteful Black Saporte brownies that taste even better than chocolate ones. I, myself, am a great cook, but unfortunately not the best baker.

The tree can grow to about 25 feet high with a width of 25 feet. Its leaves are very glossy dark green and appear as if someone polished them, leathery, alternate, with wavy margins. Originally the tree was a native to Mexico, but has spread throughout the warm areas of the tropics. Its flowers are quite small and white, and in Florida and the Caribbean it flowers in May and June. Unfortunately, it takes about nine months for the fruit to mature. I believe the ones on my tree will be ready in March.

The tree does not like cold and freezes at about 29 degrees F. Also the tree likes moist, well-drained soil having a pH of between 5.5 to 7.0. It likes full sun or light shade, and makes a wonderful addition to the looks of any tropical garden. This tree can not take drought conditions.

With respect propagation, seeds germinate in about 30 days, and seedling trees will fruit in about 5 years. The tree also does NOT have any serious pest problems. There is only one known variety, the Bell. The tree is sometimes called the Chocolate Pudding Fruit as the inside edible part of the fruit resembles chocolate pudding both with respect looks and taste when fully ripe, but has jet black seeds which chocolate pudding does not have. These seeds are very hard and one must be sure never to accidentally eat one. O'h the fruit is about the size of an orange.

Thus as can readily be seen, our heavenly Father (YHWH) has provided wonderful things of creation for our physical needs and made them also beautiful to behold.

Special note, Let's get a good discussion on the wonderful things of Creation God (YHWH) has provided for us. I have on this thread provided an excellent start. Let's get into growing wonders and not cults and negativity. I am a positive outgoing person and like everyone to be the same.

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Your Friend in Christ Iris89

Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today!

PS: More to follow in the coming days.



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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:25 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Canistel, Pouteria Campechiana:

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)

The Canistel, Pouteria Campechiana, is a fruit native to Central America, Cuba, and south Florida. The fruit can be eaten at various stages, but is most favorable when fully ripe tasting somewhat like an excellent mango at this stage. At earlier stages it is rather dry of texture and not to the likening of many individuals. It is often called the egg fruit tree due to the shape of its fruit being that of a giant egg.

The height and bushiness of the tree is highly variable. I have seen both bush and tree forms including trees over 20 feet. Also, the fruit and leaves are highly variable, but there is as yet no recognized name variety, but the Hispanic community of south Florida is attempting to selectively breed this tree. I myself am a part of this experiment, but I have not been having much success.

When some one gets a good/better specimen as a result of a 'sport' of nature, a scion is taken from it and usually side-grafted onto a tree with less desirable fruit. Only about 1 graft in 5 actually takes so one usually side-grafts a number of scions on the tree if size permits. The Rare Fruit Council International is very active in this area, and of course I am a member.

This tree would NOT make a good indoor house plant for the north.

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Nov 24, 2012 9:04 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the CARAMBOLA, Averrhoa Carambola:

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)

This is an interesting fruit as its fruit is star shapped. Some Carambolas are quite sweet and almost like candy to the taste and others are quite sour. The ones you are likely to find in the store are rather tart as the real sweet type I so much enjoy do NOT ship well.

The leaves of this tree are compound and sensitive to both light and to touch; they will fold-up when they are touched or shaded. The fruit is golden yellow when ripe, translucent, ribbed and star-shaped in cross-section.

There are many named varieties, over 40, of both sweet and sour types. The only three varieties , that in my opinion are truly sweet are the Cary, the Orkin, and the Sherimberka (probably spelt wrong). I am growing the Cary and the Sherimberka, but the Cary has done the best for me. It is very prolific with respect fruit production and its fruit are just wonderful in flavor.

It can either be eaten fresh, made into pulp and frozen, made into jellies and jams, and into juices. The juice is a drink very rich in vitamin C and of excellent flavor if made from sweet carambolas or if the sour one's juice is mixed with either orange juice or pineapple juice. Also, a candy is made from this fruit. This fruit is one of my favorites.


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Commentary on The Fig Tree, One of the Wonders of Creation:

Post  Admin on Sun Nov 25, 2012 9:17 pm

Commentary on The Fig Tree, One of the Wonders of Creation:

Micah 4:4 But they shall sit every man under his vine and under his fig tree; and none shall make them afraid: for the mouth of Jehovah of hosts hath spoken it. (American Standard Version; ASV)

The fig tree is one of the marvels of creation by Almighty God (YHWH). Many evolutionist claim life came about by chance reaction of elements to form low levels of life, but forget that the food for any life form must also be present for life to be sustained. Therefore, the fact that food sources, plants, were available at the right time, when an animal or reptile life form came into existence proves a higher power or intelligence was behind the appearance of life on the planet earth. Also, the right atmosphere must be present or the life form can not continue to exist; many other things must be present for a life form to succeed which the evolutionist conveniently forgot about or failed to take into account; therefore, the only answer is God (YHWH) as stated at Genesis 1:20, "And God said, Let the waters swarm with swarms of living creatures, and let birds fly above the earth in the open firmament of heaven." (ASV).

The fig tree played a major part in life at the time of Jesus (Yeshua) and he used it in several powerful illustrations such as at Matthew 21:19-21, "And seeing a fig tree by the way side, he came to it, and found nothing thereon, but leaves only; and he saith unto it, Let there be no fruit from thee henceforward for ever. And immediately the fig tree withered away. 20 And when the disciples saw it, they marveled, saying, How did the fig tree immediately wither away? 21 And Jesus answered and said unto them, Verily I say unto you, If ye have faith, and doubt not, ye shall not only do what is done to the fig tree, but even if ye shall say unto this mountain, Be thou taken up and cast into the sea, it shall be done." (ASV)

The cursing of the fig tree, in Matthew 21:19, is explained by the fact that the fruit of this tree appears before the leaves, and a tree so full of leaves indicated that ripe figs should be there even though it was not yet the regular season. The meaning is then, that when one has the outward show of a good character, without its fruits, he is but a hypocrite, and of no value to the kingdom of God.

The fig tree and its fruit are well known; they were very common in Palastine, and there is mention often made of then in scripture. Our first parents clothed themselves with fig leaves, Genesis 3:7, "And the eyes of them both were opened, and they knew that they were naked; and they sewed fig-leaves together, and made themselves aprons." (ASV). The prophet Isaiah gave orders to apply a clump of figs to Hezekiah's boil: at 2 Kings 20:7, "And Isaiah said, Take a cake of figs, And they took and laid it on the boil, and he recovered." (ASV).

Scientifically the fig is ficus carica. It is a somewhat strange fruit since it is actually a collection of many fruits which grow, not in a flat umbel or from a cluster of stems as many fruits do, but inside of a fleshly receptacle. The outer wall of the fig is actually a stem with a specialized shape. It forms a cavity, in some cases almost closed, in which sprout a number of tiny flowers, some male and some female. In the Smyrna fig, this cavity is almost closed at the bottom end-the end which, in apples or pears, would correspond to the blossom end. And since Smyrnas bear only female flowers, it would seem that they would be doomed to falling, infertile, from the tree each year, for lack of pollination. Which is exactly what does happen without the aid of a specialized wasp, the fig wasp, or Blastophaga psenes, which has been busy fertilizing this type of fig for many centuries in the Old world. It was not unto this was understood and the wasp was imported to this country, that Smyrna figs were successfully grown here.

However the climate which favors the culture of fig trees is not always cogenial to the fig wasp. In this country the trees may be grown where the temperature does not go below 20 degrees for extended periods. While in its completely dormant state, the tree will sometimes even survive temperatures as low as 10 to 15 degrees, though after the buds start to swell, they will be damaged at 28 to 30 degrees. The wasps, unfortunately cannot stand this cold.

However, the common fig, in contrast to the Smyrnas fig, produces its fruit asexually and any pollination or seed development which follows is not necessary to the production of fruit. Trees of the San Pedro group produce two crops, the first asexually and the second which must be fertilized by pollen from the caprifig. These two types of trees are recommended for home gardeners, even those who live in mild climates where the wasps can grow.

Fig trees are rapid growing like many tropical plants. Under favorable conditions, cuttings of certain varieties may be raised to tree size and bear a crop in the first year. I believe the easiest to grow for the home gardener are the Brown Turkey, Celeste, and the Green Ischia. When I lived in Charleston, South Carolina, I had two wonderful Celeste fig trees. One grew 20 ft. high and covered one side of a not so beautiful shead.

Besides producing a bountiful crop, fig trees, especially the Brown Turkey and the Celeste make very beautiful additions to the landscape with their large green leaves giving a tropical garden effect; however they will not grow much further north than Durham, North Carolina. If you decide to grow figs, please do NOT give them too much fertilizer, because if you do you will get plenty of leaves, but very little fruit. Also, do NOT grow on soil where cotton has ever been grown as a disease that cotton puts into the ground, cotton root rot, will kill the plant in time. Also supply sufficient water in hot dry weather, but not too much. In reality the tree does not require a lot of attention and few insects bother it extensively.

Once more, with the need of the Smyrnas fig for its relationship with the fig wasp shows the marvels of creation and that evolutionist are in error.

If you decide to grow figs or any of the other fruits I write about, please post your results and suggestions for all to see.

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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today!

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Mon Nov 26, 2012 11:58 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the GUAVA, Psidium Guajava:

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)

One of my favorite fruits that God (YHWH) has so lovingly provided for the enjoyment of mankind is the tropical GUAVA, (Psidium Guajava). It produces a very sweet fruit of fine flavor and full of vitamin C. In many Spanish speaking countries they make a delightful paste out of it somewhat of the consistency of butter that can be put on sandwiches, crackers, etc. to impart a wonderful flavor.

The common guave, Psidium Guajava, is a native to the American tropics, and has become widely distributed throughout all the warm areas of the world. In fact, its seedlings now grow wild in many areas of the tropics including south Florida and Hawaii. The common guave is often called lemon guava, pear guava, apple guava, etc. There are a great number of varieties all with different flavors some of which are more agreeable to the taste than others. Some of the varieties have round fruit, and others have oblong, pear shaped, and other shapes of fruit.

Their flesh which you eat varies in shade from white to red, but in my opinion the red colored flesh taste the best and is the sweetest.

Many food products are made from the common guava besides the paste previously mentioned. Some of these products are nectars, juices, pies, cakes, soda pop, pastries, etc. All are quite tasteful and enjoyable.

There are several important named varieties such as the Strawberry Guava, P. Catteianum, or Cattley Guava which is one of my favorites. Of this species there are many varieties ranging in size from berry size to the size of an orange.

Some Guavas are more cold hardy than others, but the berry size variety of the Strawberry Guava makes a very nice house plant in the north in a 5 to 10 gallon pot. Of course during the cold whether it must be kept in a warm area of the house. It will grown well in most well-drained loams, much, or sandy soils which are supplied with enough moisture. They require more water for their growth than do citrus trees. They are quite tolerant of acidity and alkalinity, doing well in all the circumneutral soils and even tolerating a pH down to 4.5 or up to 8.2. At either of these extremes they need more nitrogen than usual.

Some of the recognized commercial cultivators in south Florida are: Red Indian, Ruby, Supreme, Miami Red, and Miami White. Much of the work on producing other desirable clones is being conducted by members of the Cuban community in Miami, and in Dade County.

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Nov 28, 2012 10:14 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Jabuticaba, Myrciaria cauliflora.:

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)
The Jabuticaba (also called Brazilian Grape Tree, Jaboticaba, Jabotica, Guaperu, Guapuru, Hivapuru, Sabará and Ybapuru) is a fruit-bearing tree native to Brazil, Argentina, Paraguay, and Bolivia. The fruit is purplish black, with a white pulp; it can be eaten raw or be used to make jellies and drinks (plain juice or wine).
The fruit tree (named jabuticabeira in Portuguese) has salmon-colored leaves when they are young, turning green posteriorly. It is a very slow growing tree which prefers moist, lightly acidic soils for best growth. It is widely adaptable, however, and grows satisfactorily even on alkaline beach-sand type soils, so long as they are tended and irrigated. Its flowers are white and grow directly from its trunk in a cauliflorous habit. Naturally the tree may flower and fruit only once or twice a year, but when continuously irrigated it flowers frequently, and fresh fruit can be available year round in tropical regions.
The jabuticaba (Myrciaria cauliflora (Mart.) O.Berg. [Myrtaceae]) is a small tree native to Minas Gerais in southeastern Brazil grown for the purple, grape-like fruits it produces. Traditionally, an astringent decoction of the sun-dried skins has been used as a treatment for hemoptysis, asthma, diarrhea, and gargled for chronic inflammation of the tonsils. The fruit is 3-4 cm in diameter with one to four large seeds, borne directly on the main trunks and branches of the plant, lending a distinctive appearance to the fruiting tree. It has a thick, purple, astringent skin that covers a sweet, white, or rosy pink gelatinous flesh. Common in Brazilian markets, jaboticabas are largely eaten fresh; their popularity has been likened to that of grapes in the US. Fresh fruit may begin to ferment 3 to 4 days after harvest, so they are often used to make jams, tarts, strong wines, and liqueurs.
Several potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory anti-cancer compounds have been isolated from the fruit. [source of some of information - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia]

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The Kukui Nut or Candlenut Tree, Aleurites Moluccana,

Post  Admin on Thu Nov 29, 2012 9:43 am

Hi Everyone:

Genesis 1:29-30 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (American Standard Version)

The Kukui Nut or Candlenut Tree, Aleurites Moluccana, it the state tree of Hawaii, and was first brought there by Polynesian voyagers. It is a member of the Spurge family and is the official symbol of the Aha Kupuna, the Council of Elders of the Nation of Hawaii. In Hawaii it grows wild in the lower mountain forest areas and is used in gardens as a shade tree, although it is a bit messy due to dropping of its leaves and edible nuts.

The Kukui nut has many uses. Originally it was most valued for its light, the oil of the white kernels being extracted for its use in stone lamps and in ti leaf sheath torches. The shelled nuts were skewered on a coconut fond mid-rib and lit one by one, from the top to bottom, as they set in a container of sand or dirt, or in the earth itself. Childern were often given the responsibility for keeping the "candles" lit. The tree is sometimes called the Candlenut Tree. The nuts are widely used as a traditional lei, both the hard shells of the polished black, tan or brown, and immature white, which are more rare. The white flowers and downy, angularly pointed leaves are also strung as lei, representing Moloka`i, whose symbolic color is silvery green. The bark, flowers and nuts are all used for medicine. As food, a small amount of the pounded roasted nuts, plus salt and sometimes chili peppers, is used as a relish and is called `inamona.

The small, five-petaled white flowers were chewed by the parents of a young child and given to the child to aid in healing of e`a (thrush) sores inside the mouth and upon the tongue. Also used for this problem was the juicy sap that fills up the depression left when the stem is pulled off the green fruit. This is applied with the finger and rubbed inside of the child's mouth and on the tongue. The green fruit is the part of the plant that contains the nut. This sap is also a healing application for chapped lips, cold sores and mild sunburn.

One mashed nut (sometimes the raw kernel, sometimes the roasted) or the sap of the green nut was often used in combination with other traditional Hawai`i medicinal plants, particularly when a purgative for constipation was needed. The potency of this plant is so strong that these internal remedies are administered very carefully by those with experience in these matters. The late Uncle Harry Mitchell of Keanae recommended the use of kukui nut for high blood pressure. He suggested one teaspoon a day of the ground roasted kernel. Sometimes this is mixed with pressed garlic juice.

For bad cases of ulcers and other skin sores, the baked meat of ripe kukui nuts was pounded and mixed with other plants, such as ripe noni fruit. In the treatment of rheumatic joints or deep bruises and wounds, kukui and noni leaves were wrapped around the afflicted places and heat applied by hot packs of salt, sand or rocks wrapped in tapa cloth.

The inner bark provided a red-brown dye for tapa cloth and `olona cordage, while the gum from the bark strengthened the tapa. The soot (pau) of burned nuts provided a black dye for tattooing and for painting designs on canoes and on tapa cloth. The soft light-colored wood of the tree trunk was fashioned into canoes. The oil provided a varnish similar to linseed oil.

Roasted kernels, pulverized by fishermen while on the reef or in canoes, were strewn upon the ocean surface where there were small ripples and waves. The film increased underwater visibility by creating a lens on the water's surface. Fishing nets were preserved by a coating of kukui oil.

The kukui tree is a classic example of the wisdom of ancient voyaging Polynesians. The plants that they chose to bring on their canoes had to serve many useful purposes. The kukui is such a plant.

Isn't it wonderful that God (YHWH) created these wonderful nut producing trees for mankind.

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ACEROLA, Malpighia punicifolia L.

Post  Admin on Mon Dec 03, 2012 10:55 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the ACEROLA, Malpighia punicifolia L. It has many local names in the various areas in which it grows, such as Barbados Cherry, West Indian Cherry, Cereza, Cerisier, Semeruco.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)
Origin: The acerola is believed to originate from the Yucatan (linguistic evidence) and is distributed from South Texas, through Mexico (especially on the West Coast from Sonora to Guerrero) and Central America to northern South America (Venezuela, Surinam, Columbia) and throughout the Caribbean (Bahamas to Trinidad). Acerola has now been successfully introduced in sub-tropical areas throughout the world (Southeast Asia, India, South America), and some of the largest plantings are in Brazil.

Adaptation: The acerola is typically found in dry, thorn-woodlands as a deciduous tree. It grows in San Diego County, coastal Southern California and in more extreme areas with protection. There are trees in Riverside, Calif. and San Bernardino County. In general, acerola has poor cold tolerance, with young plants typically killed at temperatures below 30° F. Trees can survive brief exposure to 28° F with loss of leaves. Trees are sensitive to wind (shallow root systems). The acerola is drought tolerant, and will adopt a deciduous habit; irrigation results in leaf and flower flush. Plants can easily adapt to pot culture in well-draining, limed soil.

DESCRIPTION

Growth Habit: Large, relatively fast growing bushy shrub or small tree (to 15 feet). Can be pruned to any desired shape, but grows best as a managed shrub. Multiple or single trunks which can be trained. Occasionally, bushes appear to be composed of canes. Branches are brittle, and easily broken. Leaves may be irritating to some people. The root system is shallow, and trees can be toppled by wind, but they can be uprighted and recover over time
Foliage: Acerola leaves are dark to light green, glossy when mature, obviate to lanceolate, with minute hairs which can be irritating. Foliage will drop during water stress, but recovers well with flush and flowering.
Flowers: The flowers are sessile or on short-peduncled cymes, with small pink to white flowers with five petals. Up to 90% of flowers fall from tree, but "Blossom Set" can be used to counter this effect. Flowering can occur throughout the year, but is typically in cycles associated with rain. Irrigation can be used to induce flowering. Flowering occurs primarily on old growth. Pollination rarely observed, but thought to be by the solitary bee, Centris. Honeybees do not appear effective (contested). Cross-pollination may or may not be required depending on variety or strain (contested). In available cultivars, fruit does set without obvious pollinators or need for cross-pollination.
Fruit: Fruits are round to oblate, cherry-like but with 3 lobes. They are bright red (rarely yellow-orange) with thin skin, easily bruised. The pulp is juicy, acid to sub-acid occasionally nearly sweet, with a delicate flavor and apple notes. The fruit is very high in Vitamin C, up to 4,000 mg per 100 g fresh weight, but typically around 1,500 mg C. Green fruits have twice the Vitamin C level of mature fruits. Fruits develop to maturity in less than 25 days. Seeds typically three with fluted wings, forming a triangle. Many aspects of seed viability have not been studied. [source - retrieved from http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/acerola.html on 12/01/2012]

CULTURE

Location: The plant prefers full sun for fruit development, giving rise to the problem of winter protection in harsher climates. Shaded trees fruit, but at reduced fruit densities, and the plants themselves become somewhat spindly. Due to its shallow and smaller root system, acerola can be interplanted with other crops more closely than many trees.

Soil: Acerolas grows in marl, limestone, clay and other heavy soils as long as it drains well; waterlogging of roots will cause plant death. Soil pH should be 6.5-7.5 as acid soils do not promote vigorous growth. Liming of trees and working into the soil is a common practice and necessary for high productivity.
Irrigation: The acerola does best with 1000-2000 mm of water. However, as mentioned, acerola is drought-tolerant. Irrigation can be used to cause flowering and can regulate flower cycles. Under good constant irrigation, acerola will flower all year, with between 1 and 3 flowering peaks. Acerola does well with both overhead and drip irrigation.

Fertilization: Acerolas requires a good, balanced fertilization schedule, and regular (once a year) liming of soil. Foliar sprays are very effective, and are used commercially. Mineral nutrition is very important, with good levels of boron and iron required.

Pruning: The plant will tolerate heavy pruning, but requires time for recovery. In more tropical areas, plants do not seem overly affected by pruning. Plants are pruned commercially with citrus pruners. Can be kept as a small bush (e.g. 5 ft) and will produce well.

Frost Protection: As with most frost-sensitive plants, the acerola will need some protection when grown in areas were frost can occur. Growing with overhead protection or growing next to a wall or building may be sufficient, but the plant may also be covered with heavy cloth or plastic sheeting draped over a frame for added protection. Container grown plants can be moved too a frost secure area.

Propagation: Acerolas can be propagated by seed, cutting, grafting, and other standard methods. The plant does not appear stringent in its requirements. Seed viability can be very low; in some groves, seedlings are never observed. Cuttings are considered the simplest method of propagation and, with the use standard IBA hormone, give near 100% success rates. Grafting onto rootstocks has not been systematically studied, although grafts onto Byrsonima crassifolia rootstock have been successful. [source - retrieved from http://www.crfg.org/pubs/ff/acerola.html on 12/01/2012]

MEDICAL USES

Acerola is a fruit. It is rich in vitamin C, and also contains vitamin A, thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin. People use it for medicine.

Acerola is used to treat or prevent scurvy, a disease caused by vitamin C deficiency. Acerola is also used for preventing heart disease, “hardening of the arteries” (atherosclerosis), blood clots, and cancer.

Some people use it to treat the common cold, pressure sores, bleeding in the eye (retinal hemorrhages), tooth decay, gum infections, depression, hay fever, and collagen disorders. Athletes use acerola for improving physical endurance. [source - retrieved from http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-608-ACEROLA.aspx?activeIngredientId=608&activeIngredientName=ACEROLA on 12 /01/2010]

MANY NATURAL VITAMIN ‘C’ USE THE ACEROLA AS THE MAIN ACTIVE INGREDIANT

Both species of Malpighia have been reported to be excellent sources of vitamin C. However, the fruit of M. emarginata is known more accurately as acerola and is one of the richest sources of vitamin C. Acerola is used as a source of food and juice. Because of its high concentration of vitamin C, it also is sold as a natural health supplement. Acerola provides other useful vitamins and minerals. Acerola contains from 1 to 4.5 percent vitamin C (1,000 to 4,500 mg/100 g) in the edible portion of the fruit. This far exceeds the content of vitamin C in peeled oranges (about 0.05 or 50 mg/100 g). The content of vitamin C in acerola varies with ripeness (highest in green and lowest in fully ripened fruit). It also varies with the season and climate. Vitamin C analysis regarding acerola storage finds freezing the fruits to be the best way to preserve vitamin C, as compared with room temperature or refrigeration. In addition, acerola contains vitamin A (4,300 to 12,500 IU/100 g) at about the same level as in carrots. Other constituents include thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, calcium, iron, and bioflavonoids. It also contains phosphorus, malic acid, pantothenic acid, potassium, and magnesium. The sugars dextrose, fructose, and sucrose are also present. Acerola analysis in another report finds protein, fiber, lipids, and fatty acids. Zinc and other minerals are present, as well. Vitamin C is an essential coenzyme that is required for normal metabolic function. Many animals can synthesize vitamin C from glucose; however, humans must obtain the vitamin totally from dietary sources. Deficiencies of this water-soluble vitamin result in scurvy. This is a potentially fatal disease with multisystem involvement. Dietary supplements have traditionally provided adequate protection against the development of this disease. However, controversy has focused on whether vitamin C derived from “natural” sources is more physiologic than that produced synthetically or semisynthetically (as ascorbic acid). To date, there is no clear evidence that naturally derived vitamin C is superior in its clinical effectiveness than synthetic ascorbic acid. There is a potential advantage to using acerola as a source of vitamin C. The advantage is that one receives not only ascorbic acid but also several other useful vitamins and minerals from the fruit. Whether this is superior to the use of a multiple vitamin preparation has not been determined. Research reveals no clinical data regarding the use of acerola for vitamin supplementation. [source - retrieved from http://www.drugs.com/npc/acerola.html on 12/01/2010]
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Dragon Fruit, Hylocereus species,

Post  Admin on Wed Dec 05, 2012 10:33 am


Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, Dragon Fruit, Hylocereus species, a veining cactus of much promise. Why? It requires very little water in order to grow and San Diego farmers who are looking for a profitable plant that will reduce their water bill are strongly considering this plant.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)

Dragon fruit are fast growing, climbing cacti and require support to grow. A tree, a post, a trellis, or special box supports at 3 to 4 feet make excellent growing supports. It is only when they grow up one of these and start to have the new growth hanging down that they produce their fruit. Flowering of Dragon Fruit, Hylocereus species, is triggered by two days in a row of heavy rains with warm weather. Fruit develop quickly and usually ripen approximately 4 weeks after flowering. In general, only stems which are horizontal or hanging down will flower. The fruit can be picked anytime after coloring, though are usually best 5 to 7 days after initial color. Once the tips of the fins on the fruit turn brown, the fruit should be picked if they haven’t been already. Plants in general need at least 3 to 4 hours of direct sun in order to flower. They love mulch, fertilizer and water. Some varieties such as Vietnamese Jaina, Purple Haze, Physical Graffiti, Natural Mystic, Haley’s Comet, Dark Star, American Beauty, etc. are self-fertile. However, many varieties require hand pollination to increase fruit set and fruit size. They do very well on palm trees, branching, hanging down and fruiting as they climb,. They do best on palms which naturally shed their frounds which prevents them from climbing over the crown. I however grow my Vietnamese Jaina on a post set 2 feet into the ground with a small wooden frame 2 to 3 feet from the ground. They should be pushed with fertilizer and mulch until they get to the top of whatever they are growing on. Do not use herbicides any near Dragon Fruit plants, but being a cactus they are very drought tolerant and once established require little care. To see pictures of Dragon Fruit, go to http://www.mauidragonfruit.com/ or http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/dragon_fruit.htm

PROPOGATION:

The dragon fruit plant can grow easily from vine cuttings. Plant the vine in good potting soil only 1 to 2 inch deep. Water once every two week and let the soil dry up. With filtered sunlight and warm temperature, the vine will grow root first. Once the root is established, new vines will sprout from the nodes.

FOOD VALUE OF DRAGON FRUIT:

One dragonfruit can weigh between 150 and 600g, but with its thick covering, only about 60 percent is edible. To enjoy dragonfruits, it is best to eat the creamy pulp cold. The middle part is the sweetest, and after cutting the fruits in half, you just have to spoon the flesh out. Dragonfruits are common in Asia (particularly in Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines) and in Central and South America. They are among the many wonder fruits that are said to provide multiple health benefits. In addition, dragonfruits help protect the environment because they absorb carbon dioxide at nighttime, and then release oxygen to purify the air.

Calories,
If you are looking for fruits that are filling and delicious, but will help keep your weight in check, dragonfruits are a perfect choice. A 100g serving of dragonfruit has only 60 calories: 18 calories from fat (all unsaturated), 8 calories from protein and 34 calories from carbohydrates. Dragonfruits do not have complex carbohydrates, so they can be easily broken down by the body.

Fats and Cholesterol,
Dragonfruits do not contain cholesterol, saturated fat and trans fat, so regular consumption will help manage your blood pressure and control your cholesterol levels. The seeds of dragonfruits are high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids) that reduce triglycerides and lower the risk of cardiovascular disorder.

Fiber,
Dragonfruits are high in fiber, so regular consumption can help avoid constipation, improve your digestive health and help you reduce weight.

Vitamins and Minerals,
Dragonfruits are rich in vitamin C, containing 9mg per serving that is equivalent to 10 percent of the daily value. Thus, eating dragonfruits helps strengthen your immune system and promotes faster healing of bruises and wounds. In fact, regular eating of dragonfruits will help ward off chronic respiratory disorders such as asthma and cough. Dragonfruits also contain B vitamins such as B1 for better carbohydrate metabolism, B2 for recovery and improvement of appetite, and B3 for reducing bad cholesterol while improving the skin condition.

Dragonfruits are also packed with minerals such as calcium for stronger bones and teeth, phosphorus for tissue formation and iron for healthy blood. One dragonfruit contains approximately 8.8g of calcium, 36.1mg of phosphorus and 0.65mg of iron.

Phytoalbumins,
Dragonfruits contain phytoalbumins, which have antioxidant properties that help prevent the formation of cancer cells. In addition, dragonfruits are also known to increase the excretion of heavy metal toxins from the body.

Lycopene,
Lycopene is also present in dragonfruits, and this is the pigment responsible for their red color. Lycopene is said to prevent prostate cancer. [source - retrieved from http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/the-nutritional-value-of-dragonfruit.html on 12/02/2012]

Vernacular names of Hylocereus
These fruits are commonly known as "dragon fruit" as in the Chinese hu? lóng gu?, "fire dragon fruit", and lóng zh? gu?, "dragon pearl fruit". The Vietnamese thanh long meaning "green dragon", the Indonesian and Malaysian buah naga, the Lao mark mang gohn, and the Thai kaeo mangkon or "dragon crystal". Other vernacular names are strawberry pear or nanettika fruit. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitaya on 12/02/2012]
As can be readily seen, Dragon Fruit is a wonderful gift from Almighty God (YHWH).

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Soursop or graviola

Post  Admin on Sun Dec 09, 2012 10:03 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Soursop or graviola is the fruit of Annona muricata, a broadleaf, flowering, evergreen tree native to Mexico, Cuba, Central America, the Caribbean, extreme southern Florida and the Florida Keys, and northern South America: Colombia, Brazil, Peru, and Venezuela. Soursop is also produced in sub-Saharan African countries that lie within the tropics. It fruit and juice of the fruit are strong medicine against some cancers.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Adaptation
The soursop is adapted to areas of high humidity and relatively warm winters; temperatures below 5 °C (41 °F) will cause damage to leaves and small branches, and temperatures below 3 °C (37 °F) can be fatal. The fruit becomes dry and is no longer good for concentrate.

Cultivation and uses
The plant is grown as a commercial crop for its 20–30 cm (7.9–12 in) long, prickly, green fruit, which can have a mass of up to 15 lb (6.8 kg)[2], making it probably the second biggest annona after the junglesop.
Away from its native area, some limited production occurs as far north as southern Florida within USDA Zone 10; however, these are mostly garden plantings for local consumption. It is also grown in parts of Southeast Asia and abundant on the Island of Mauritius. The soursop will reportedly fruit as a container specimen, even in temperate climates, if protected from cool temperatures.
The flesh of the fruit consists of an edible, white pulp, some fiber, and a core of indigestible, black seeds. The species is the only member of its genus suitable for processing and preservation.[citation needed] The sweet pulp is used to make juice, as well as candies, sorbets, and ice cream flavorings.
In Mexico , Colombia and Harar (Ethiopia ), it is a common fruit, often used for dessert as the only ingredient, or as an agua fresca beverage; in Colombia, it is a fruit for juices, mixed with milk. Ice cream and fruit bars made of soursop are also very popular. The seeds are normally left in the preparation, and removed while consuming.

In Indonesia, dodol sirsak, a sweetmeat, is made by boiling soursop pulp in water and adding sugar until the mixture hardens. Soursop is also a common ingredient for making fresh fruit juices that are sold by street food vendors. In the Philippines, it is called guyabano, obviously derived from the Spanish guanabana, and is eaten ripe, or used to make juices, smoothies, or ice cream. Sometimes, they use the leaf in tenderizing meat. In Vietnam, this fruit is called mãng c?u Xiêm in the south, or mãng c?u in the north, and is used to make smoothies, or eaten as is. In Cambodia, this fruit is called tearb barung, literally "western custard-apple fruit." In Malaysia, it is known in Malay as durian belanda and in East Malaysia, specifically among the Dusun people of Sabah, it is locally known as lampun. Popularly, it is eaten raw when it ripens. Usually the fruits are taken from the tree when they mature and left to ripen in a dark corner, whereby they will be eaten when they are fully ripe. It has a white flower with a very pleasing scent, especially in the morning. While for people in Brunei Darussalam this fruit is popularly known as "Durian Salat", widely available and easily planted. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soursop on 12/05/2012]

Use Against Cancer

Graviola Tree and Paw Paw Treatments For Cancer

How It Works
These products come from trees in the tropical areas of South and North America. They kill cancer cells as a minimum, but may have other affects on cancer. Paw Paw is known to work by blocking ATP production and thus reduce the voltage of the cancer cell to the point it falls apart (apoptosis or programmed cell death). Because Paw Paw and graviola are cousins, I assume that is also the way graviola works. They are also known to build the immunity system.

Graviola Tree and Paw Paw Tree
This is one of those treatments for cancer that is fairly new, meaning it has only recently found its way onto the internet. Nevertheless, there have been a lot of scientific studies on these two products. At the current time most of the articles for Graviola and cancer come from a single source - the Health Sciences Institute (see the links below), though there are a growing number of independent articles.

I recommend graviola on the basis of several scientific articles, several testimonials, and several comments by practitioners (mostly from Brazil), however, Paw Paw is actually stronger than graviola at treating cancer. Paw Paw is the more potent of the two because of its more sophisticated and larger molecular structures. Graviola is sometimes called "Brazilian Paw Paw," which can cause some confusion.

Paw Paw is clearly more powerful than graviola when treating cancer, if the quality of the processing is comparable. However, I would take freshly cut graviola over bottled Paw Paw (but American's can't get freshly cut graviola). Graviola only has single ring compounds, while the Paw Paw's acetogenins have several double ring compounds (e.g. bullatacin) which makes Paw Paw much more powerful.

Paw Paw works (and I assume graviola as well) by slowing down or stopping the production of ATP. This in turn lowers the voltage of the cell. For normal cells, there is plenty of ATP, thus lowering the level of ATP has no effect on the cell. However, with cancer cells, due to the way they create energy (by fermentation), ATP is far more critical.
When the ATP level, and the energy of the cell level, drops to a critical level the cell falls apart. The residual pieces of the dead cancer cell are called "lysing" and I assume are similiar to other apoptosis (programmed cell death) killed cells. If that is the case, then part of the lysing is literally "eaten" by other cells (called: phagocytosed).

However, because the cancer cells in a cancer patient are frequently clusted together, a large amount of lysing can be created within a cancer patient such that high levels of clustered lysing cannot be eaten by surrounding cells. Such a situation is especially dangerous for lung cancer patients and brain cancer patients where a clustered amount of lysing can be very dangerous.

Here is some technical information on graviola:
* "The Annonaceous acetogenins discovered in graviola thus far include: annocatalin, annohexocin, annomonicin, annomontacin, annomuricatin A & B, annomuricin A thru E, annomutacin, annonacin, annonacinone, annopentocin A thru C, cis-annonacin, cis-corossolone, cohibin A thru D, corepoxylone, coronin, corossolin, corossolone, donhexocin, epomuricenin A & B, gigantetrocin, gigantetrocin A & B, gigantetrocinone, gigantetronenin, goniothalamicin, iso-annonacin, javoricin, montanacin, montecristin, muracin A thru G, muricapentocin, muricatalicin, muricatalin, muri-catenol, muricatetrocin A & B muricatin D, muricatocin A thru C muricin H, muricin I, muricoreacin, murihexocin 3, murihexocin A thru C, murihexol, murisolin, robustocin, rolliniastatin 1 & 2, saba-delin, solamin, uvariamicin I & IV, xylomaticin.

http://www.naturalpharmacy.com/learn-more/graviola
Graviola, like its cousin Paw Paw, is known to greatly enhace the effectiveness of another alternative cancer treatment - Protocel. However, generally it is recommended that Protocel not be taken with graviola or Paw Paw. There are exceptions, see my Protocel article for more information:

Protocel Article
Because of the similarity of Paw Paw and graviola to Protocel, there is no doubt in my mind that in order to maximize the effectiveness of these products, they should be taken in exactly the same way as Protocel. In other words, every 6 hours, EXACTLY - 24 hours a day.
I would strongly recommend studying the Protocel article linked to above for information that will help you take these products.
Paw Paw has been shown to kill multiple-drug resistant (MDR) cells, which result from someone taking chemotherapy. This is critical to understand because when a person on orthodox treatments comes out of remission into regression, a high percentage of their cancer cells are MDR cells. This would REQUIRE the use of Paw Paw to treat these patients.

Paw Paw is not toxic according to studies with beagles (dogs). It appears to be impossible to 'overdose', 32 capsules 4x/day were non toxic because it caused vomiting.

Paw Paw gravitates towards cells that use a lot of energy and then cuts off their energy supply. Since cancer cells use 10-17 times as much energy as a normal cell, Paw Paw acts on cancer cells. It is the same mechanism that made it so useful as a parasite cleanse and to kill hair lice.

It is also the reason that pregnant women should not take Paw Paw. Paw Paw could see some of the fast growing cells in the fetus as high energy cells. In addition, some of the cells in a fetus are very similar to cancer cells (i.e. the "trophoblastic" cells), so pregnant women should ALWAYS be careful what they take for cancer.

If no cancer, parasite, or other high energy users are available, Paw Paw may gravitate towards fast growing cells lining the digestive and intestinal system walls. This is why the main manufacturer, Nature's Sunshine, strongly cautions against long term use for non-cancer patients. Some people with cancer have reported digestion distress such as nausea. For this reason it is recommended to take Paw Paw with food.

Warnings For Both Products
In the past, it was thought that the effectiveness of Paw Paw, like Protocel, was damaged by taking antioxidants with Paw Paw. However, new research has shown that this is not the case. I quote from an email I received:

* "The head of NSP research, Dr. Bill Keller, provided Paw Paw with supporting products to a research oncologist and his laboratory to test with actual cultures. Several of Nature's Sunshine strong antioxidants were also provided. The research personnel concluded overwhelmingly that there was no negative prevention of Paw Paw action as a result of the antioxidants."

email to CancerTutor
Important Note: The above email is not the end of the story. Nature's Sunshine researchers are still looking into this issue because there are some antioxidants that DO increase ATP energy, which would conflict with the use of Paw Paw, graviola and Protocel. I will put the results of their research on this web site as soon as I get more information!!
Also, I do not know which antioxidants may conflict with graviola. If you buy graviola, check with the vendor for recommendations.

No one with Parkinsons Disease should take Paw Paw or graviola unless alkaloid-free preparations are used. There is also a possibility of allergic reactions in sensitive individuals.

Supercharging This Treatment
Paw Paw is generally considered stronger than graviola. This does not mean that graviola should not be used. Cat's Claw and Ellagic Acid seem to be items that people like to combine with Graviola. However, if you take Cat's Claw make sure you take a product like Samento, which is a TOA-free Cat's Claw.

An alternative cancer treatment should be a complete treatment protocol. Do NOT forget to study the complete treatment protocol for Stage I, II and III cancer patients and the complete treatment protocol for Stage IV cancer patients:

Liquid Graviola
One company I know of, All-Vita NorthWest, produces a liquid extract and their URL is http://www.allvita.net/graviola.htm.

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Tue Dec 11, 2012 6:35 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Cornelian Cherry is a member of the Cornus (Dogwood) family which produces an edible fruit with acidic flavors similar to the cranberry and sour cherry. The fruit is a red drupe, which is mainly used in jams but can be eaten dried. The habit of the plant is a medium to large shrub or small tree. The Cornelian Cherry is also known as Cornus mas or European Cornel.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

The Cornelian Cherry Dogwood is native to central and southern Europe, and to Asia. It probably was introduced into this country before 1800. Several varieties have been developed since its introduction. This tree grows well in a variety of soils and is tolerant of soil conditions. In the Midwestern United States it reportedly is the longest-lived kind of dogwood tree. Some people grow this dogwood as a hedge, in which case it produces a dense, almost impenetrable thicket of branches. It also can be grown as a large shrub. The Cornelian Cherry Dogwood is relatively free from insect pests and diseases. Some birds feed on the fruit of this tree. [source - retrieved from http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact%20pages/dogwood_cornelian_cherry/dogwood_cornelian_cherry.html on 12/10/2012] . Unlike most other dogwood trees, the Cornelian Cherry, produces edible fruit with a rather pleasing taste and grow quite well in most areas other than the extreme south and/or north .in North America, i.e., U.S.D.A. Hardiness Zones 3 to 8.
Cornelian Cherry like a sunny location with good soil drainage. Water regularly and deeply for the first year, especially during dry periods. Fertilize with an all purpose fertilizer before the plant comes out of dormancy in the spring. Adding mulch annually reduces weeds and preserves moisture. Prune annually to remove old and dead wood and to encourage new growth. Fruit is usually borne on new growth. Most Cornelian Cherry varieties have clusters of small yellow flowers before the leaves open,

Pictures of Cornelian Cherry tree are available at http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact%20pages/dogwood_cornelian_cherry/dogwood_cornelian_cherry.html

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:46 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Sweet Scarlet Goumi. The Goumi is a deciduous or semi-evergreen shrub. The Chinese consider its fruit a nutraceutical because of its edible and medicinal qualities and values. The fruit is a round to oval drupe which ripens to red and dotted with silver or brown. It is acidic and juicy and said to help decrease cholesterol. Goumi is a member of Elaeagnus family.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Sweet Scarlet Goumi goes by various names such as Goumi Berry, Gumi, Natsugumi, Cherry Silverberry, and its scientific name is Elaeagnus mutliflora ovata
The fruit is scarlet, 1/2" long, tart, cherry-like fruit, high in vitamin 'C' . Good fresh and excellent for jelly & pies. Ask us for recipe. Vigorous, hardy & productive bush grows 8-10' high, 12-14' wide. Ripens in Spring. Self-fertile. No major pests or diseases. An unusual Nitrogen fixing shrub that is not a member of Fabaceae, when planted in orchards other fruit yields are said to increase.

Plant is a sunny (1/2 day sun is necessary)location with good drainage. Water regularly and deeply for the first year, especially during dry periods. Fertilize with an all purpose fertilizer before the plant comes out of dormancy in the spring. Adding mulch annually to reduces weeds and preserves moisture. If needed, use an insecticidal soap during the growing season to control insect pests. Annual pruning is not necessary except to remove dead and old wood. The Goumi grows well in most areas other than the extreme south and/or north . In North America, i.e., U.S.D.A. Hardiness Zones 4 to 8.
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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Fri Dec 14, 2012 11:57 pm

Hi Everyone:

Genesis 1:29-30 And God said, Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed; to you it shall be for food: 30 and to every beast of the earth, and to every bird of the heavens, and to everything that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is life, [I have given] every green herb for food: and it was so. (American Standard Version)

The Malabar Chestnut, Pachira Aquatica, is native to an area from southern Mexico to Guyana and northern Brazil, and is related to Baobob, (Adansonia digitata), Durian (Durio zibethinus), Almirajo (Patinoa almirajo), Chupa-chupa, South American Sapote (Quararibea cordata). Tropical estuaries are the native habitat of the Malabar chestnut, so it is perhaps best suited to Hawaii and southern Florida. Even so, the plant also grows well in the milder parts of southern California. Several handsome specimens are thriving in the Quail Gardens collection near Encinitas, Calif., which has more cold and wind than many home gardens. The plant will tolerate brief exposure to temperatures as low as 28° F, but may drop some or most of its leaves. Malabar chestnuts make attractive potted plants and add an attractive tropical note to patios and sun rooms.

The Malabar chestnut is a very showy evergreen tree with greenish bark that can grow to 60 ft. in the tropics. In California the growth is more like 10 to 15 ft. tall with a spread of 8 to 10 feet. Its nuts are five-valved fruit of Malabar chestnut is an ovoid, woody green pod which may reach 4 to 12 inches in length and 2 to 2-1/2 inches in diameter, bearing some resemblance to kapok or silk floss seed pods. The tightly packed seeds (nuts) inside enlarge until the pod bursts and the seed fall to the ground. The rounded seeds are without floss and 1/2 inch or larger in diameter. They are edible raw or roasted. Besides tasty nuts, it has beautiful flowers, The petals of the very large creamy white flowers of the Malabar chestnut curl back to the base of the flower, leaving only the spectacular clusters of 3 to 4 inch cream-white stamens. And in appearance whether as a house plant or outdoors in warm areas is very striking and outstanding. The shiny, bright green, alternate palmately compound leaves of the Malabar chestnut grow to about 12 inches long and are quickly shed. They are larger and showier than Chorisia speciosa, the popular floss-silk tree. Young leaves and flowers are cooked and used as a vegetable. I would highly recommend this as a house plant in the north, but it must be kept in a warm location.

One note on harvesting from the Malabar Chestnut, The nuts of the Malabar chestnut are harvested when the seed pods burst. The raw nuts taste like peanuts and will keep for months in a cool, dry place. Roasted or fried in oil they have the flavor of chestnuts, and can be ground into a flour for bread baking.

Isn't it wonderful that God (YHWH) created these wonderful nut producing trees for mankind.

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Mango, Mangifera Indica,

Post  Admin on Tue Dec 18, 2012 4:46 pm

Hi Everyone

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Mango, Mangifera Indica, which originated in India and Southeast Asia, but has spread world wide in the tropics and is the largest fruit crop in the world on the basis of tons of fruit picked.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV).

And the Mango surely is a wonderful gift to mankind from our Creator, Almighty God (YHWH), and the are many varieties of Mangoes, even more than that of Apples. The trees are Evergreen and some varieties can reach 50 feet [15 to 16 meters] high, but there are miniature varieties such as the Fairchild that only grow to about 10 feet [8 meters] high. Most varieties have a very good flavor, but there are some that are known as the turpentine Mangoes that one can hardly eat; however, goats and pigs like them. My goat, named Billy, really loved them.

However, my favorite eating varieties are the Bombay, Carrie, Hayden, Julian, and Keith. I especially like the Bombay as it is one of the very few "freestone" mangoes and yet one of the very best tasting with almost no fiber - a true delight. Most Mango varieties are NOT free stone and the flesh tends to stick very hard to the big seed in the center of the fruit.

Mangoes vary in size, shape, and color. They can be round, oblong, or kidney shaped. The trees are quite beautiful and make nice additions to any tropical landscape. The leaves are long, narrow, and a beautiful deep green, and new growth comes out in flushes.

For fruit trees, the Mango is rather fast growing with respect production of fruit with the trees usually producing fruit by the third year if the trees are grafted trees or five years if they are not.

There are two principle types of Mangoes, the Indian and the Indo-Chinese. Indian mangoes usually have brightly colored fruit, but unfortunately are susceptible to anthracnose; whereas the Indo-Chinese usually do not produce brightly colored fruit, but are resistant to anthracnose.

One sad note, some people are very allergic to Mangoes and should not eat them or touch the tree.

Most Mangoes bear heavily in alternate years and the blossoms are very susceptible to cold weather, anything below 34 degrees F. can kill the blossoms and ruin the crop production. Fortunately, Mangoes for the most part are self-fruitful so you do not need more than one tree to obtain fruit. They should always be planted in full sun and well drained soil having a pH between 5.5 and 7.5.

The Mango can either be eaten fresh, made into pulp and frozen, made into jellies and jams, into pies and Mango cobbler, and into juices. The juice is a drink very rich in vitamin C and of excellent flavor if made from sweet Mangos. This fruit is one of my favorites.

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the Mountain Ash or Rowan trees

Post  Admin on Sun Dec 23, 2012 10:48 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Mountain Ash or Rowan trees are a popular ornamental species derived from the genus Pyrus. The trees are referred to by both names, though the Mountain Ash moniker is used primarily in North America, while Rowan is the preferred name in Europe. Actually, there are two main branches of the Mountain Ash; The tree species Sorbus americana (syn. Pyrus americana) is commonly known as the American Mountain-ash. It is a relatively small (height 12 meters / 40 feet) deciduous perennial tree, native to eastern northern North America. The european Mountain Ash tends to be either a small tree or a large bush..

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Mountain Ash Realities
The mountain ash is actually not an ash but a member of the rose family. Sorbus aucuparia is a European native and the most widely planted of a large group of similar shrubs and trees. The native mountain ashes are just as beautiful, but most species tend to be shrubby in nature. The European mountain ash has a more distinctly treelike form.
Description of mountain ash tree: This small to medium tree (up to 50 feet tall) has light grayish bark and an oval, open head at maturity. It produces clusters of white flowers in spring followed by bright, long-lasting, orange-red berries in fall that attract birds. The deciduous leaves are toothed and pinnately compound. They are dark, dull green in summer and yellow to reddish in fall.
Growing mountain ash tree: Grow in full sun in rich, well-drained, acid soils. It is short-lived under alkaline conditions. The tree transplants well. Mountain ashes are highly susceptible to borers and fireblight, among other pests. They are best grown in the northern part of their range where cool summers are not conducive to these problems. [source - retrieved from http://home.howstuffworks.com/mountain-ash-tree.htm on 12/05/2012]
Food Uses of The Mountain Ash
Berries of the tree can be eaten and, in Britain, they are commonly used to make jelly. This diverse species found around the world is also thought to have medicinal purpose. However, the eat ability of the berries and/or fruit of the Mountain Ash varies widely. Some I have tasted have excellent flavor and others in my opinion would be a food only of desperation.
The named cultivators I have found to have excellent edible fruit are Ivan’s Beauty, Ivan’s Belle, Rabina Mountain Ash, Shipova Mountain Ash (a cross of Mountain Ash and Pear. These are obtainable from www.jungseed.com, http://www.coldstreamfarm.net/?gclid=CNaBtNK5hLQCFUid4AodDlsAJg, and www.Gurneys.com.
Important items to remember if you are going to plant Mountain Ash for fruit, you must plant two varieties, as most are NOT self fertile or only mildly so.
To see a picture of a Mountain Ash tree, go to http://www.ehow.com/how_2337562_grow-mountain-ash-trees.html
Adaptability
Mountain Ash grow in U.S.D.A hardiness zones 3 to 9. They tend to need little care once they have grown accustomed to their location and few insects seem to attack them. It prefers a rich moist soil and the borders of swamps, but will flourish on rocky hillsides. Mountain Ash trees prefer full sun. Avoid planting the tree in the shade of a large building or near trees that tower over it. If the tree is robbed of sunlight, its flower and fruit production will be reduced.
The tree grows better in slightly moist, acidic soil. Do not over water the Mountain Ash. Most Mountain Ash types do not need to be fertilized, though if your soil lacks nutrients you could add some fertilizer to the base of a young tree.
Pruning is essential with Mountain Ash trees as it needs to be trained to maintain a single trunk. If regular maintenance is not done, the tree will become multi-stemmed over time.
Most common diseases are,
Cytospora Canker: This fungal disease targets the tree's trunk and branches by peppering it with brown, irregular shaped cankers. The ugly pimple-like masses can ooze and spread throughout the Mountain Ash. In severe case, the disease can kill the tree. Fire Blight: This infection kills the tree's flowers and leaves. Symptoms include black leaves, brown flower clusters and spores that ooze slime and infect the tree's branches. Leaf Spot: This shows as irregular, brown spots on leaves. If left untreated, tiny, black spores will form as well. Advance cases also cause leaves to drop prematurely.
Medical Uses

Mountain Ash berries contain high levels of Vitamin C. Some cultures used to squeeze the juice from the berries, and drink it to prevent scurvy. Today, the berries are placed in tea and consumed to treat urinary tract infections and diarrhea. In some cases, the fruit juices are extracted and administered intravenously to treat glaucoma. Centuries ago, the bark from the tree was used as a blood cleanser.

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Dec 26, 2012 8:19 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Pouteria caimito, the abiu, is a tropical fruit tree originated in the Amazonian region of South America. It will grow an average of 33 feet (10 m) high, and can grow as high as 116 feet (35 m) under good conditions. Its fruit’s shape varies from round to oval with a point. When ripe, it has smooth bright yellow skin and will have one to four ovate seeds.[1]† The inside of the fruit is translucent and white. It has a creamy and jelly-like texture and its taste is similar to the sapodilla — a sweet caramel custard. The abiu tree is part of the Sapotaceae family and is very similar in appearance to the canistel.[2]
The abiu, Pouteria caimito, is commonly considered as native to the headwaters of the Amazon. It grows wild in the lower eastern part of the Andes from southwestern Venezuela to Peru. It also grows around Iquitos, Peru and it will commonly be found in the Province of Guayas in Ecuador, where it's sold in the markets. Due to early and widespread cultivation by Amerindians, its original distribution in Brazil, outside the Amazon, is uncertain. In the Amazon basin, it is found to grow heavily in Pará but is also found sparsely in collections from the Atlantic rainforest near Rio de Janeiro and Bahia.[3] It can also be found in Colombia in areas such as the regions of Caquetá, Meta and Vaupes and it is very plentiful in Amazonas, Venezuela. It has also been growing for a very long time in Trinidad.
The abiu grows best in areas that have a year-round moist and a warm climate. It will do well in wet soil high in ammonia and reptilic embryotic fluid. Specifically from the Erythrolamprus bizona. It can now be found throughout most of the Amazon. It is a common dooryard tree in the backyards and streets in the city of many Brazilian towns, but it is not usually grown commercially. The abiu habitats are nearly all tropical. It will thrive in a place that has a year round warm and moist climate, although it has been known to grow well in Rio de Janeiro, which is a somewhat cooler climate. In Peru it cannot grow above 2,000 feet (610 m) feet in elevation, but in Colombia it has been found growing up to an elevation of 6,000 feet (1,800 m).
Mature abiu trees produce one hundred to one thousand fruits each year.[4] These have a pale, translucent pulp of a custard consistency that is easily scooped out with a spoon; there may also be a few bits of tougher gel. The seeds are easily removed and are covered with a thin layer of adherent pulp. The fruit has a sweet, mild taste which may have a hint of pineapple but is best described as reminiscent of caramel flan. It is often used in ice cream or eaten out of hand.
Unripe fruits contain a gummy and unpalatable latex that hardens upon exposure to air. The skin of the ripe fruit is a pale yellow color with a leathery texture and residual latex. Because mature fruits will continue to ripen when picked, the harvest can be timed to allow for transportation to market. However, this period may be as short as five days.[5] Maturation can be recognized by the pale green-to-yellow color break and the ripe fruit can be identified by its yellow coloration and a slight softness. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abiu on 12/25/2012]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

It can only be grown in North America in the southern part of Florida, and the University of Florida says the following:

Fruit
Ovoid to round, 1 ½ to 4 inches (3.8-10.2 cm) in diameter, 10 to 25 oz (283-708 g), commonly with a short nipple at the apex. The peel is smooth, tough, and pale to bright yellow when ripe. The pulp is white, translucent, jelly-like, mild-flavored, and sweet in better selections and insipid in undesirable trees. There are 1 to 5 brown seeds. Immature fruit is permeated with unpleasant, gummy latex; fully ripe fruit have little to no latex. Fruit take 100 to 130 days from flowering.
Pollination
No specific information on the pollination requirements or pollinators (insects) of abiu has been documented. Flying insects are probably the pollinators.
Varieties
There are a number of abiu varieties (e.g., 'Gray', 'Z-2'); however, few selections or varieties are available in Florida. There is a lot of variability among seedling trees.
Climate
Abiu grows best in hot, humid, tropical climates with well distributed rainfall. Trees may grow well in warm, humid, subtropical areas if protected from constant winds and freezing temperatures. Optimum growth temperatures are from 68 to 95°F (20-35°C). Abiu trees are sensitive to cool, non-freezing temperatures and windy conditions, and should be planted only in warm, wind-protected areas. Young trees may be killed at temperatures below 32°F (0°C) and mature trees at 29 to 31°F (-0.5 to -1.6°C).
Propagation
Abiu is commonly propagated by seed; seedling trees usually begin fruit production in 3 to 4 years after planting. Once extracted from the fruit, abiu seeds do not remain viable for more than a couple of days and should therefore be planted as soon possible into clean, well-drained media. Seedling trees come into production in 2 to 5 years from planting. Abiu may also be grafted or budded onto seedling rootstocks and begin fruiting in 1 to 2 years.
Production (Crop Yields)
The amount of fruit produced varies greatly among abiu seedling trees. Some mature seedling trees may produce little fruit; others yield 400 lbs (182 kg) of fruit per year. Historically abiu season in Florida has been during the fall.
Spacing
Abiu trees should be planted at least 25 ft (7.6 m) from nearby trees and structures because mature trees not regularly pruned may become quite large.
Soils
Abiu trees are best adapted to fertile, acid- to slightly alkaline-pH (5.5-7.5), well-drained soils. Trees growing in high-pH, alkaline soils may develop iron deficiency.
Planting an Abiu Tree in the Home Landscape
Proper planting is one of the most important steps in successfully establishing and growing a strong, productive tree. The first step is to choose a healthy nursery tree. Commonly, nursery abiu trees are grown in 3-gallon (11-liter) containers and trees stand 2 to 4 ft (0.6-0.9 m) from the surface of the soil media. Large trees in smaller containers should be avoided as the root system may be "root bound." This means all the available space in the container has been filled with roots to the point that the tap root is growing along the edge of the container in a circular fashion. Root bound root systems may not grow properly once planted in the ground. Inspect the tree for insect pests and diseases, and inspect the trunk of the tree for wounds and constrictions. Select a healthy tree and water it regularly in preparation for planting in the ground.
Site Selection
In general, abiu trees should be planted in full sun for best growth and fruit production. Select a part of the landscape away from other trees, buildings and structures, and power lines. Remember, abiu trees can become large if not pruned to contain their size. Select the warmest area of the landscape that does not flood (or remain wet) after typical summer rainfall.
Planting in Sandy Soil
Many areas in Florida have sandy soil. Remove a 3- to 10-ft-diameter (0.9- to 3.1-m) ring of grass sod. Dig a hole 3 to 4 times the diameter and 3 times as deep as the container the abiu tree came in. Making a large hole loosens the soil next to the new tree, making it easy for the roots to expand into the adjacent soil. It is not necessary to apply fertilizer, topsoil, or compost to the hole. In fact, placing topsoil or compost in the hole first and then planting on top of it is not desirable. If you wish to add topsoil or compost to the native soil, mix it with the excavated soil in no more than a 1:1 ratio.
Backfill the hole with some of the excavated native soil. Remove the tree from the container and place it in the hole so that the top of the soil media from the container is level with or slightly above the surrounding soil level. Fill soil in around the tree roots and tamp slightly to remove air pockets. Immediately water the soil around the tree and tree roots. Staking the tree with a wooden or bamboo stake is optional. However, do not use wire or nylon rope to tie the tree to the stake because they may eventually damage the tree trunk as it grows. Use a cotton or natural fiber string that will degrade slowly.
Planting in Rockland Soil
Many areas in Miami-Dade County have a very shallow soil, and several inches below the soil surface is hard, calcareous bedrock. Remove a 3- to 10-ft-diameter (0.9- to 3.1-m) ring of grass sod. Make a hole 3 to 4 times the diameter and 3 times as deep as the container the abiu tree came in. To dig a hole, use a pick and digging bar to break up the rock or contract with a company that has augering equipment or a backhoe. Plant the tree as described for sandy soils.
Planting on a Mound
Many areas in Florida are within 7 ft (2.1 m) or so of the water table and experience occasional flooding after heavy rains. To improve plant survival consider planting fruit trees on a 2- to 3-ft-high by 4- to 10-ft-diameter (0.6- to 0.9-m by1.2- to 3.1-m) mound of native soil. After the mound is made, dig a hole 3 to 4 times the diameter and 3 times as deep as the container the tree came in. In areas where the bedrock nearly comes to the surface (rockland soil), follow the recommendations for the previous section. In areas with sandy soil follow the recommendations from the section on planting in sandy soil.
Care of Abiu Trees in the Home Landscape
A calendar outlining the month-to-month cultural practices for abiu is shown in Table 1.
Fertilizer
In Florida, young trees should be fertilized every 1 to 2 months during the first year, beginning with 1/4 lb (114 g) of fertilizer and increasing to 1 lb (455 g) per tree (Table 2). Thereafter, 3 or 4 applications per year in amounts proportionate to the increasing size of the tree are sufficient, but do not exceed 20 lbs per tree per year.
Fertilizer mixtures containing 6 to 10% nitrogen, 6 to 10% available phosphoric acid, 6 to 10% potash, and 4 to 6% magnesium give satisfactory results with young trees. For bearing trees, potash should be increased to 9 to 15% and available phosphoric acid reduced to 2 to 4%. Examples of commonly available fertilizer mixes include 6-6-6-2 [6 (N)-6 (P2O5)-6 (K2O)-2 (Mg)] and 8-3-9-2 [8 (N)-3 (P2O5)-6 (K2O)-3 (Mg)].
From spring through summer, trees should receive 3 to 4 annual nutritional sprays of copper, zinc, manganese, and boron for the first 4 to 5 years. Abiu trees are susceptible to iron deficiency under alkaline and high-pH soil conditions. Iron deficiency can be prevented or corrected by periodic soil applications of iron chelates formulated for alkaline and high-soil-pH conditions. Periodic applications of ferrous (iron) sulfate may be made to trees growing in low-pH soils.
Irrigation (Watering)
Newly planted abiu trees should be watered at planting and every other day for the first month or so and then 1 to 2 times a week for the next couple of months. During prolonged dry periods (e.g., 5 or more days of little to no rainfall), newly planted and young abiu trees (first 3 years) should be well watered twice a week. Once the rainy season arrives, irrigation may be reduced or stopped.
Once abiu trees are 4 or more years old, irrigation will be beneficial to plant growth and crop yields during prolonged dry periods. The specific water requirements for mature trees have not been determined. However, as with other tree crops, the period from bloom and through fruit development is important, and drought stress should be avoided at this time with periodic watering.
Abiu Trees and Lawn Care
Abiu trees in the home landscape are susceptible to trunk injury caused by lawn mowers and weed eaters. Maintain a grass-free area 2 to 5 or more feet (0.6-1.5 m) away from the trunk of the tree. Never hit the tree trunk with lawn mowing equipment, and never use a weed eater near the tree trunk. Mechanical damage to the trunk of the tree will weaken the tree and, if severe enough, can cause dieback or kill the tree.
Roots of mature abiu trees spread beyond the drip-line of the tree canopy. Heavy fertilization of the lawn next to abiu trees is not recommended because it may reduce fruiting and or fruit quality. The use of lawn sprinkler systems on a timer may result in over watering and cause abiu trees to decline. This is because too much water too often applied causes root rot.
Pruning
Young abiu trees should be trained to form 3 to 5 main scaffold limbs during the first 2 to 3 years after planting. Mature trees should be maintained at 8 to 12 ft (2.4-3.7 m) by annual, selective removal of poorly placed and upright limbs.
Mulch
Mulching abiu trees in the home landscape helps retain soil moisture, reduces weed problems next to the tree trunk, and improves the soil near the surface. Mulch with a 2- to 6-inch (5- to 15-cm) layer of bark, wood chips, or similar mulch material. Keep mulch 8 to 12 inches (20-30 cm) from the trunk.
Insect Pests and Diseases
Few insect pests attack abiu, however, as the number of trees increases, various insects will most likely be found feeding on abiu. The Caribbean fruit fly (Anastrepha suspensa) attacks abiu allowed to over ripen (golden yellow color) on the tree. This may be prevented by picking fully mature fruit before they ripen on the tree. Please contact your local county extension agent for current control recommendations.
Harvest, Ripening, and Storage
As abiu fruit mature, the peel changes from green to light green and then yellow, indicating it is ready to pick. Abiu should only be picked when fully mature, i.e., partial color break to full yellow color; however, fruit with a dark golden color are overripe. Fruit picked before fully mature contain a large amount of sticky, white latex, making consumption unpleasant. Mature fruit should be placed at room temperature to ripen fully (full yellow color development); usually in 1 to 5 days. Once fully ripe, fruit may be stored in the refrigerator for several days prior to consumption. [source - retrieved from http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/hs300 on 12/12/2012]


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Dec 26, 2012 8:30 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Mountain Ash or Rowan trees are a popular ornamental species derived from the genus Pyrus. The trees are referred to by both names, though the Mountain Ash moniker is used primarily in North America, while Rowan is the preferred name in Europe. Actually, there are two main branches of the Mountain Ash; The tree species Sorbus americana (syn. Pyrus americana) is commonly known as the American Mountain-ash. It is a relatively small (height 12 meters / 40 feet) deciduous perennial tree, native to eastern northern North America. The european Mountain Ash tends to be either a small tree or a large bush..

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Mountain Ash Realities
The mountain ash is actually not an ash but a member of the rose family. Sorbus aucuparia is a European native and the most widely planted of a large group of similar shrubs and trees. The native mountain ashes are just as beautiful, but most species tend to be shrubby in nature. The European mountain ash has a more distinctly treelike form.
Description of mountain ash tree: This small to medium tree (up to 50 feet tall) has light grayish bark and an oval, open head at maturity. It produces clusters of white flowers in spring followed by bright, long-lasting, orange-red berries in fall that attract birds. The deciduous leaves are toothed and pinnately compound. They are dark, dull green in summer and yellow to reddish in fall.
Growing mountain ash tree: Grow in full sun in rich, well-drained, acid soils. It is short-lived under alkaline conditions. The tree transplants well. Mountain ashes are highly susceptible to borers and fireblight, among other pests. They are best grown in the northern part of their range where cool summers are not conducive to these problems. [source - retrieved from http://home.howstuffworks.com/mountain-ash-tree.htm on 12/05/2012]
Food Uses of The Mountain Ash
Berries of the tree can be eaten and, in Britain, they are commonly used to make jelly. This diverse species found around the world is also thought to have medicinal purpose. However, the eat ability of the berries and/or fruit of the Mountain Ash varies widely. Some I have tasted have excellent flavor and others in my opinion would be a food only of desperation.
The named cultivators I have found to have excellent edible fruit are Ivan’s Beauty, Ivan’s Belle, Rabina Mountain Ash, Shipova Mountain Ash (a cross of Mountain Ash and Pear. These are obtainable from www.jungseed.com, http://www.coldstreamfarm.net/?gclid=CNaBtNK5hLQCFUid4AodDlsAJg, and www.Gurneys.com.
Important items to remember if you are going to plant Mountain Ash for fruit, you must plant two varieties, as most are NOT self fertile or only mildly so.
To see a picture of a Mountain Ash tree, go to http://www.ehow.com/how_2337562_grow-mountain-ash-trees.html
Adaptability
Mountain Ash grow in U.S.D.A hardiness zones 3 to 9. They tend to need little care once they have grown accustomed to their location and few insects seem to attack them. It prefers a rich moist soil and the borders of swamps, but will flourish on rocky hillsides. Mountain Ash trees prefer full sun. Avoid planting the tree in the shade of a large building or near trees that tower over it. If the tree is robbed of sunlight, its flower and fruit production will be reduced.
The tree grows better in slightly moist, acidic soil. Do not over water the Mountain Ash. Most Mountain Ash types do not need to be fertilized, though if your soil lacks nutrients you could add some fertilizer to the base of a young tree.
Pruning is essential with Mountain Ash trees as it needs to be trained to maintain a single trunk. If regular maintenance is not done, the tree will become multi-stemmed over time.
Most common diseases are,
Cytospora Canker: This fungal disease targets the tree's trunk and branches by peppering it with brown, irregular shaped cankers. The ugly pimple-like masses can ooze and spread throughout the Mountain Ash. In severe case, the disease can kill the tree. Fire Blight: This infection kills the tree's flowers and leaves. Symptoms include black leaves, brown flower clusters and spores that ooze slime and infect the tree's branches. Leaf Spot: This shows as irregular, brown spots on leaves. If left untreated, tiny, black spores will form as well. Advance cases also cause leaves to drop prematurely.
Medical Uses

Mountain Ash berries contain high levels of Vitamin C. Some cultures used to squeeze the juice from the berries, and drink it to prevent scurvy. Today, the berries are placed in tea and consumed to treat urinary tract infections and diarrhea. In some cases, the fruit juices are extracted and administered intravenously to treat glaucoma. Centuries ago, the bark from the tree was used as a blood cleanser.

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Medical Uses

Mountain Ash berries contain high levels of Vitamin C. Some cultures used to squeeze the juice from the berries, and drink it to prevent scurvy. Today, the berries are placed in tea and consumed to treat urinary tract infections and diarrhea. In some cases, the fruit juices are extracted and administered intravenously to treat glaucoma. Centuries ago, the bark from the tree was used as a blood cleanser.



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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Dec 29, 2012 12:16 pm


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the ackee tree (Blighia sapida) which grows up to 40 feet tall and produces a fruit that is safe to eat only if harvested at the right time and served correctly. It has glossy evergreen leaves that grow up to 8 inches long. Ackee fruit, also called vegetable brain, has a tough red peel when fully ripe. It splits open to reveal the seeds and yellow flesh when ready to eat. Ackee trees require full sun and plentiful moisture for successful fruit production. They are capable of surviving temperatures that dip as low as 26 degrees F. [source - retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/how_8629920_grow-ackee-tree.html on 12/25/2012]
Note, extreme caution must be used in picking and using ackee fruit as it can be highly poisonous if picked at the wrong time and/or prepared in the wrong way. But properly prepared it is very tasty with cod fish. An encyclopedia says, “Toxicity


Hypoglycin molecule
The unripened or inedible portions of the fruit contain the toxins hypoglycin A and hypoglycin B. Hypoglycin A is found in both the seeds and the arils, while hypoglycin B is found only in the seeds.[2] Hypoglycin is converted in the body to methylenecyclopropyl acetic acid (MCPA). Hypoglycin and MCPA are both toxic. MCPA inhibits several enzymes involved in the breakdown of acyl CoA compounds. Hypoglycin binds irreversibly to coenzyme A, carnitine and carnitine acyltransferases I and II[9] reducing their bioavailability and consequently inhibiting beta oxidation of fatty acids. Beta oxidation normally provides the body with ATP, NADH, and acetyl CoA which is used to supplement the energy produced by glycolysis. Glucose stores are consequently depleted leading to hypoglycemia.[10] Clinically, this condition is called Jamaican vomiting sickness. Ill effects occur only when the immature fruit is consumed. . [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ackee on 12/25/2012]

Another source- says, “More widely known for its poisonous properties than as an edible fruit, the akee, Blighia sapida K. Konig (syn. Cupania sapida Voigt.), of the family Sapindaceae, is sometimes called ackee, akee apple, or vegetable brain (seso vegetal in Spanish). Other Spanish names are arbol de seso, palo de seso (Cuba); huevo vegetal and fruto de huevo (Guatemala and Panama); arbor del huevo and pera roja (Mexico); merey del diablo (Venezuela); bien me sabe or pan y quesito (Colombia); akí (Costa Rica). In Portuguese, it is castanha or castanheiro de Africa. In French, it is arbre fricassé or arbre a fricasser (Haiti); yeux de crabe or ris de veau (Martinique). In Surinam it is known as akie. On the Ivory Coast of West Africa, it is called kaka or finzan; in the Sudan, finza. Elsewhere in Africa it is generally known as akye, akyen or ishin, though it has many other dialectal names. In the timber trade, the wood is marketed as achin.
It should be noted that the name "akee" may refer to the mamoncillo, q.v., in Barbados. As a colloquial term for the mamoncillo it may be a corruption of the Mayan "acche" which was applied to several plants whose flowers attract honeybees.” [source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/akee.html on 12/25/2012]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

The ackee, also known as achee, akee apple or akee (Blighia sapida) is a member of the Sapindaceae (soapberry family), native to tropical West Africa in Cameroon, Gabon, São Tomé and Príncipe, Benin, Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone and Togo.[1]
It is related to the lychee and the longan, and is an evergreen tree that grows about 10 metres tall, with a short trunk and a dense crown. The leaves are pinnate,[2] leathery, compound, 15–30 centimetres long, with 6–10 elliptical obovate-oblong leaflets. Each leaflet is 8–12 centimetres long and 5–8 centimetres broad.
The flowers are unisexual and fragrant. They have five petals, are greenish-white[3] and bloom during warm months.[4] The fruit is pear-shaped. When it ripens, it turns from green to a bright red to yellow-orange, and splits open to reveal three large, shiny black seeds, surrounded by soft, creamy or spongy, white to yellow flesh—arilli.[2] The fruit typically weighs 100–200 grams.[2]
The scientific name honours Captain William Bligh who took the fruit from Jamaica to the Royal Botanic Gardens in Kew, England in 1793 and introduced it to science. The common name is derived from the West African Akye fufo. The term ackee originated from the Akan language.[5]
The fruit was imported to Jamaica from West Africa (probably on a slave ship) before 1778.[6] Since then it has become a major feature of various Caribbean cuisines, and is also cultivated in tropical and subtropical areas elsewhere around the world.
Ackee and saltfish, a traditional Jamaican dish
Although native to West Africa, the use of ackee in food is especially prominent in Jamaican cuisine. Ackee is the national fruit of Jamaica, and ackee and saltfish is the national dish. Ackee and Codfish is ranked number 2 in the world by National Geographic survery of National dishes around the world. http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/top-10/national-food-dishes/ [7]
Ackee was introduced to Jamaica and later to Haiti, Cuba, Barbados and others. It was later introduced to Florida in the United States.
Ackee pods are allowed to ripen and open naturally on the tree before picking. Prior to cooking, the ackee arils are cleaned and washed. The arils are then boiled for approximately 10 minutes and the water discarded. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ackee on 12/25/2012]


Planting instructions for the ackee tree:

1.
o 1
Water the ackee tree just before transplanting it outdoors.
o 2
Prepare the growing site by eliminating vegetation and loosening the soil 10 to 12 inches deep.
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o 3
Dig a hole that is the same depth as the ackee tree's container and double its diameter.
o 4
Place the roots into the hole at the same level they were originally planted. Water until the soil is very moist to the base of the root ball.
o 5
Water every two days during the first week after transplanting the tree to the garden.
o 6
Continue to water once or twice each week during the first two months after planting. Once established, provide supplemental moisture only when conditions are very dry.
o 7
Broadcast 2 to 6 inches of organic mulch under the tree, extending out 2 to 5 feet from the trunk. This will keep weeds from sprouting and reduce the risk of injury during lawn mowing.
o 8
Fertilize with 1/2 lb. of 6-6-6-2 fertilizer every other month throughout the first year after planting. Feed once during each season after the first year, gradually increasing the amount of fertilizer as the tree grows. Avoid applying more than 20 lbs. of fertilizer in a one-year period.
o 9
Prune to control the size of the tree in spring, when there is no longer a danger of frost. Thin the branches each year to allow more light to penetrate. Also eliminate dead or broken growth at this time. . [source - retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/how_8629920_grow-ackee-tree.html on 12/25/2012]

With respect to eating the akee fruit another reference says, “Akee—Jamaica’s National Dish
BY AWAKE! CORRESPONDENT IN JAMAICA
IT IS Sunday morning on the Caribbean island of Jamaica. “Breakfast is served,” announces the cheerful hostess to her foreign visitor.
“I see we are having scrambled eggs for breakfast,” the visitor says.
“Oh no,” answers the housewife, “that is akee and salt fish. Taste it.”
“It is delicious,” her visitor responds. “But it certainly looks like scrambled eggs! What is akee? Is it a fruit or a vegetable?”
“That is an old question,” replies the housewife. “Botanically, akee is regarded as a fruit, but on the dining table, it is considered by many to be a vegetable.”
Let us tell you more about akee.
An Appreciated Tree
The akee tree originated in West Africa. According to the book A-Z of Jamaican Heritage, by Olive Senior, the first plants reached Jamaica when they were purchased from the captain of a slave ship in the 18th century. The name akee is believed by some to originate from the word ankye of the Twi language of Ghana.
Akee trees are big, reaching up to about 50 feet [15 m] in height. They can be found all over Jamaica, and their fruit is eaten by all classes of people. The dish prepared with akee is fondly called Jamaica’s national dish. Akee is usually mixed with imported salted codfish in a sauce of onions, peppers, and other seasonings. When the salted cod is not available, akee is eaten with other fish or meats or by itself.
The immature fruit of the akee tree is greenish in color, but as it matures it takes on a bright reddish color. When fully mature, the fruit bursts open and is ready to be picked. When the fruit opens, three arils are exposed, each of which has a black seed attached to the top. The cream-colored arils are the parts that are actually eaten after the black seeds and the reddish substance in the center of the arils are removed.
When a Source of Danger
Occasionally there have been incidents of food poisoning—especially in children—that have been associated with the eating of akee. Investigations have pinpointed the cause to be the eating of immature fruit. Research has confirmed that before the fruit bursts open, it contains hypoglycin, an amino acid.
Biochemists have discovered that hypoglycin interferes with the breakdown of fatty acids. This can lead to a buildup in the blood of various short chain acids, causing drowsiness and coma. Hypoglycin also blocks the production of blood glucose, which is vital to metabolism.
Findings indicate that the hypoglycin in akees is dissolved when unopened fruits are cooked. Therefore, the water in which akee is cooked should be discarded and should not be used to cook any other food. Warnings about the danger of eating or cooking immature akees have been given from time to time by the Department of Public Health.
Most lovers of akee say that they have eaten it all their lives and have never suffered harmful effects. So some may deny that akee can be dangerous.
Popularity Growing
In spite of the periodic reports of poisonings, akee and salt fish is growing in popularity as a Jamaican meal. Yet, the partnership has come under threat, as the price of imported codfish has increased dramatically in recent years. But akee can be prepared with other kinds of fish and meats, so the majority of people will probably not abandon this national dish of Jamaica.
If your interest in akee has been stirred, you may not have to visit here to sample it because it has become a popular export. Yes, akee is canned and shipped to other countries, especially lands to which large numbers of Jamaicans have immigrated. So if you see canned akee in your country or if you pay a visit to Jamaica, try eating some akee and salt fish. Who knows? You too may fall in love with its unique taste! [source - retrieved from Awake of 10/22/1996]



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Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper, pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta,[

Post  Admin on Mon Dec 31, 2012 12:47 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Allspice, also called Jamaica pepper, pepper, myrtle pepper, pimenta,[1] or newspice, is a spice that is the dried unripe fruit ("berries") of Pimenta dioica, a mid-canopy tree native to the Greater Antilles, southern Mexico, and Central America, now cultivated in many warm parts of the world.[2] The name allspice was coined as early as 1621 by the English, who thought it combined the flavour of cinnamon, nutmeg, and cloves.[3]
Several unrelated fragrant shrubs are called "Carolina allspice" (Calycanthus floridus), "Japanese allspice" (Chimonanthus praecox) or "wild allspice" (Lindera benzoin). Allspice is also sometimes used to refer to the herb costmary (Tanacetum balsamita). [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allspice on 12/25/2012]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Allspice is the dried fruit of the Pimenta dioica plant. The fruit are picked when green and unripe and, traditionally, dried in the sun. When dry, the fruit are brown and resemble large brown peppercorns. The whole fruit have a longer shelf life than the powdered product and produce a more aromatic product when freshly ground before use.
Fresh leaves are used where available. They are similar in texture to bay leaves and are thus infused during cooking and then removed before serving. Unlike bay leaves, they lose much flavour when dried and stored, so do not figure in commerce. The leaves and wood are often used for smoking meats where allspice is a local crop. Allspice can also be found in essential oil form.
Allspice is one of the most important ingredients of Caribbean cuisine. It is used in Caribbean jerk seasoning (the wood is used to smoke jerk in Jamaica, although the spice is a good substitute), in moles, and in pickling; it is also an ingredient in commercial sausage preparations and curry powders. Allspice is also indispensable in Middle Eastern cuisine, particularly in the Levant, where it is used to flavour a variety of stews and meat dishes. In Palestinian cuisine, for example, many main dishes call for allspice as the sole spice added for flavouring. In America, it is used mostly in desserts, but it is also responsible for giving Cincinnati-style chili its distinctive aroma and flavour. Allspice is commonly used in Great Britain, and appears in many dishes, including cakes. Even in many countries where allspice is not very popular in the household, as in Germany, it is used in large amounts by commercial sausage makers. It is a main flavour used in barbecue sauces.[citation needed] In the West Indies, an allspice liqueur called "pimento dram" is produced, and a sweet liqueur called mirto is made in Sardinia.
The allspice tree, classified as an evergreen shrub, reaches heights between 10 and 18 m(32 and 60 ft). Allspice can be a small, scrubby tree, quite similar to the bay laurel in size and form. It can also be a tall, canopy tree, sometimes grown to provide shade for coffee trees planted underneath it. It can be grown outdoors in the tropics and subtropics with normal garden soil and watering. Smaller plants can be killed by frost, although larger plants are more tolerant. It adapts well to container culture and can be kept as a houseplant or in a greenhouse. The plant is dioecious, meaning plants are either male or female, hence male and female plants must be kept in proximity to allow fruit to develop[5].
To protect the pimenta trade, the plant was guarded against export from Jamaica. Many attempts at growing the pimenta from seeds were reported, but all failed. At one time, the plant was thought to grow nowhere except in Jamaica, where the plant was readily spread by birds. Experiments were then performed using the constituents of bird droppings; however, these were also totally unsuccessful. Eventually, passage through the avian gut, either the acidity or the elevated temperature, was found to be essential for germinating the seeds. Today, pimenta is spread by birds in Tonga and Hawaii, where it has become naturalized on Kaua?i and Maui. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allspice on 12/25/2012]
Allspice takes its name from its aroma, which smells like a combination of spices, especially cinnamon, cloves, ginger and nutmeg. In much of the world, allspice is called pimento because the Spanish mistook the fruit for black pepper, which the Spanish called pimienta. This is especially confusing since the Spanish had already called chillies pimientos. Lets also thank the Spanish for centuries of linguistic confusion created by naming all the natives they met ‘Indians’.
Allspice is the only spice that is grown exclusively in the Western Hemisphere. The evergreen tree that produces the allspice berries is indigenous to the rainforests of South and Central America where it grows wild. Unfortunately the wild trees were cut down to harvest the berries and few remain today. There are plantations in Mexico and parts of Central America but the finest allspice comes from Jamaica where the climate and soil are best suited to producing the aromatic berries. [source - retrieved from http://theepicentre.com/spice/allspice-2/ on 12/25/2012]
Allspice Cooking Tips and Substitutions
• Allspice can be substituted for cloves in many recipes.

• For a flavorful peppercorn mixture for your peppermill, add whole allspice berries in equal proportions to green, black, and white peppercorns.

• To further intensify the flavor and aroma of whole allspice berries, place them on a cookie sheet and roast in a 350-degree F. oven until they begin to smell, about 10 minutes. Achieve the same effect by using a heavy dry frypan on the stovetop, shaking often over medium-high heat for about 5 minutes. Watch carefully so they do not burn and become bitter. Cool before using.

• When using allspice in yeast breads, limit the amount to 1/4 teaspoon per cup of flour.

• The allspice can inhibit the activity of the yeast in large amounts.

• 6 whole allspice berries = 1/4 to 1/2 tsp ground allspice.

• 1 teaspoon ground allspice = 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon plus 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves. [source - retrieved from http://homecooking.about.com/od/spices/a/allspicetips.htm on 12/25/2012]

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Thu Jan 03, 2013 10:50 am


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Spondias dulcis, ambarella, (and its alternative binomial, Spondias cytherea, Malay apple), or golden apple, is an equatorial or tropical tree, with edible fruit containing a fibrous pit. It is known by many names in various regions, including pomme cythere in Trinidad and Tobago,[1] Dominica, Guadeloupe and Martinique,[2] June plum in Bermuda and Jamaica,[1] juplon in Costa Rica, jobo indio in Venezuela, caja-manga or cajarana in Brazil, and qu? cóc in Vietnam. Kedondong in Indonesia .
This fast-growing tree can reach up to 60 ft (18 m) in its native homeland of Melanesia through Polynesia; however, it usually averages 30 to 40 ft (9–12 m) in other areas. Spondias dulcis has deciduous, pinnate leaves, 8 to 24 in (20–60 cm) in length, composed of 9 to 25 glossy, elliptic or obovate-oblong leaflets 2.5 to 4.0 in (6.25–10 cm) long, finely toothed toward the apex.[3] The tree produces small, inconspicuous white flowers in terminal panicles, assorted male, female. Its oval fruits, 2.5 to 3.5 in (6.25–9 cm) long, are long-stalked and are produced in bunches of 12 or more. Over several weeks, the fruit fall to the ground while still green and hard, turning golden-yellow as they ripen. According to Morton (1987), “some fruits in the South Sea Islands weigh over 1 lb (0.45 kg) each”.
Native to Melanesia through Polynesia, S. dulcis has been introduced into tropical areas across the world. The species was introduced into Jamaica in 1782, and, among other places, is also cultivated in Panama, Cuba, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, and also from Puerto Rico to Trinidad, and eastern Sucre, in Venezuela. Although the United States Department of Agriculture received seeds from Liberia in 1909, S. dulcis has yet to become popular in America.
Spondias dulcis is most commonly used as a food source. Its fruit may be eaten raw; the flesh is crunchy and a little sour. In Indonesia and Malaysia, S. dulcis is eaten with shrimp paste (a thick, black, salty-sweet sauce, called hayko in Chinese Southern Min dialect). It is an ingredient in rujak" in Indonesia or 'rojak in Malaysia, and may also be juiced, which is called kedondong"' juice in Indonesia, umbra juice in Malaysia, or balonglong juice in Singapore.
Alternative food uses include cooking the fruit into a preserve, similar in consistency to apple butter, sauce flavoring, soups, and stews.
In Fiji, it is used to make jam.
In Samoa and Tonga it is used to make otai.
In West Java, its young leaves are used as seasoning for pepes.
In Sri Lanka a common use is to make an "acharu" with the fruit. Which entails cutting and soaking it vinegar, chilli and other spices to give a tangy pickeled flavor, often eaten as a snack.
In Vietnam, it is not considered as a regular "table" fruit, just a snack. It is consumed unripe, like green mangoes, sliced and dipped in a mixture of salt, sugar and fresh chili, or in shrimp paste. Another recipe favored by children is to macerate it in liquid, artificially sweetened licorice extract.
In Jamaica, it is mostly considered a novelty, especially by children. The fruit is peeled and sprinkled with salt. The sourness and saltiness provide amusement. The fruit is also made into a drink sweetened with sugar and spiced with some ginger. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ambarella on 12/25/2012]
In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Propagation
The tree is easily propagated by seeds, which germinate in about 4 weeks, or by large hardwood cuttings, or air-layers. It can be grafted on its own rootstock, but Firminger says that in India it is usually grafted on the native S. pinnata Kurz (see below). Wester advised: "Use non-petioled, slender, mature, but green and smooth budwood; cut large buds with ample wood-shield, 1 1/2 to 1 3/4 in (4-4.5 cm) long; insert the buds in the stock at a point of approximately the same age and appearance as the scion."
Culture
Seedlings may fruit when only 4 years old. Ochse recommends that the young trees be given light shade. Mature trees are somewhat brittle and apt to be damaged by strong winds; therefore, sheltered locations are preferred.
Season
In Hawaii, the fruit ripens from November to April; in Tahiti, from May to July. In Florida, a single tree provides a steady supply for a family from fall to midwinter, at a time when mangos and many other popular fruits are out of season.
Pests and Diseases
Ochse says that in Indonesia the leaves are severely attacked by the larvae of the kedongdong spring-beetle, Podontia affinis. In Costa Rica, the bark is eaten by a wasp ("Congo"), causing necrosis which leads to death. No particular insects or diseases have been reported in Florida. In Jamaica, the tree is subject to gummosis and is consequently short-lived.
Food Uses
The ambarella has suffered by comparison with the mango and by repetition in literature of its inferior quality. However, taken at the proper stage, while still firm, it is relished by many out-of-hand, and it yields a delicious juice for cold beverages. If the crisp sliced flesh is stewed with a little water and sugar and then strained through a wire sieve, it makes a most acceptable product, much like traditional applesauce but with a richer flavor. With the addition of cinnamon or any other spices desired, this sauce can be slowly cooked down to a thick consistency to make a preserve very similar to apple butter. Unripe fruits can be made into jelly, pickles or relishes, or used for flavoring sauces, soups and stews.
Young ambarella leaves are appealingly acid and consumed raw in southeast Asia. In Indonesia, they are steamed and eaten as a vegetable with salted fish and rice, and also used as seasoning for various dishes. They are sometimes cooked with meat to tenderize it. [source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/ambarella_ars.html on 12/25/2012]
Picture available at http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/ambarella.htm.

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Jan 05, 2013 3:08 pm


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Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the atemoya, Annona squamosa × A. cherimola, is a hybrid of the sugar apple and cherimoya, qq.v. The tree closely resembles that of the cherimoya; is fast-growing; may reach 25 to 30 ft (7.5-9 m) and is short-bunked, the branches typically drooping and the lowest touching the ground. The leaves are deciduous, alternate, elliptical, leathery, less hairy than those of the cherimoya; and up to 6 in (15 cm) in length. The flowers are long-stalked, triangular, yellow, 2 3/8 in (6 cm) long and 1 1/2 to 2 in (4-5 cm) wide. The fruit is conical or heart-shaped, generally to 4 in (10 cm) long and to 3 3/4 in(9.5 cm) wide; some weighing as much as 5 lbs(2.25 kg); pale bluish-green or pea-green, and slightly yellowish between the areoles. The rind, 1/8 in (3 mm) thick, is composed of fused areoles more prominent and angular than those of the sugar apple, with tips that are rounded or slightly upturned; firm, pliable, and indehiscent. The fragrant flesh is snowy-white, of fine texture, almost solid, not conspicuously divided into segments, with fewer seeds than the sugar apple; sweet and subacid at the same time and resemblirig the cherimoya in flavor. The seeds are cylindrical, 3/4 in (2 cm) long and 5/16 in (8 mm) wide; so dark a brown as to appear black; hard and smooth. [source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/atemoya.html on 12/31/2012]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

An atemoya is normally heart-shaped or rounded, with pale-green, easily bruised, bumpy skin. Near the stem, the skin is bumpy as it is in the sugar-apple, but become smoother like the cherimoya on the bottom. The flesh is not segmented like that of the sugar-apple, bearing more similarity to that of the cherimoya. It is very juicy and smooth, tasting slightly sweet and a little tart, reminiscent of a piña colada. The taste also resembles vanilla from its sugar-apple parent.[1] Many inedible, toxic, black seeds are found throughout the flesh of the atemoya.[2] When ripe, the fruit can be scooped out of the shell and eaten chilled.[1]

Atemoya (Annona cherimola × squamosa) was developed by crossing cherimoya (A. cherimola) with sugar-apple (A. squamosa). The first cross was made in 1908 by P.J. Wester, a horticulturist at the USDA’s Subtropical Laboratory in Miami.
The resulting fruits were of superior quality to the sugar-apple and were given the name "atemoya", a combination of ate, an old Mexican name for sugar-apple, and "moya" from cherimoya.

Subsequently, in 1917, Edward Simmons at Miami’s Plant Introduction Station successfully grew hybrids that survived a drop in temperature to 26.5°F, showing atemoya’s hardiness derived from one of its parents, the cherimoya.
The atemoya, like other Annona trees, bears protogynous, hermaphroditic flowers, and self-pollination is rare. Therefore, artificial, hand pollination almost always guarantees superior quality fruits. One variety, 'Geffner', produces well without hand pollination. Atemoyas are sometimes misshapen, underdeveloped on one side, as the result of inadequate pollination.
An atemoya flower, in its female stage, opens between 2:00 and 4:00 pm; between 3:00 pm and 5:00 pm on the following afternoon, the flower converts to its male stage.
References Cited Above:

1. ^ a b Clarke, Joan (1998). "Hawai’i". In Feierabend, Peter; Chassman, Gary; Danforth, Randi. Culinaria: The United States: A Culinary Discovery. Köln, Germany: Könemann. pp. 476. ISBN 3-8290-0259-9.
2. ^ Purdue New Crops Profile
[source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atemoya on 12/31/2012]

This is one of my favorite fruits, but I rarely get to eat one. Do not try to grow one from seed as they will NOT come true from seed. And unless you have a great deal of spare time to hand pollinate, it is best not even to grow one commercially obtained.

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cotopriz, Talisia oliviformis

Post  Admin on Mon Jan 07, 2013 12:08 pm


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the cotopriz, Talisia oliviformis. Common Name: Canip. This is a fruit tree that can grow up to 20 feet high. Native to Belize, Central America and northern South America. This fruit is an extremely popular fruit that is eagerly consumed by children and commonly sold in markets. Easy to grow from seed; the seeds will germinate in 30 to 60 days and the plants will bloom and produce fruit in three to four years.

It is rather dangerous for small children to eat due to the danger of the large seed slipping down the throat while eating the good tasting pulp around it and chocking the child..

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

It grows in most soils, but prefers a slightly acid PH.

(NOTE- Anyone having more information on this tree, please post.)

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The avocado

Post  Admin on Fri Jan 11, 2013 12:53 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the The avocado (Persea americana) is a tree native to Central Mexico, classified in the flowering plant family Lauraceae along with cinnamon, camphor and bay laurel. Avocado or alligator pear also refers to the fruit (botanically a large berry that contains a single seed) of the tree.
Avocados are commercially valuable and are cultivated in tropical and Mediterranean climates throughout the world. They have a green-skinned, fleshy body that may be pear-shaped, egg-shaped, or spherical, and ripens after harvesting. Trees are partially self-pollinating and often are propagated through grafting to maintain a predictable quality and quantity of the fruit. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avocados on 12/31/2012]
In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

The tree grows to 20 m (66 ft), with alternately arranged leaves 12 centimetres (4.7 in) – 25 centimetres (9.8 in) long. The flowers are inconspicuous, greenish-yellow, 5 millimetres (0.2 in) – 10 millimetres (0.4 in) wide. The pear-shaped fruit is 7 centimetres (2.8 in) – 20 centimetres (7.9 in) long, weighs between 100 grams (3.5 oz) – 1,000 grams (35 oz), and has a large central seed, 5 centimetres (2.0 in) – 6.4 centimetres (2.5 in) long.
The subtropical species needs a climate without frost and with little wind. High winds reduce the humidity, dehydrate the flowers, and affect pollination. When even a mild frost occurs, premature fruit drop may occur, although the Hass cultivar can tolerate temperatures down to ?1°C. The trees also need well-aerated soils, ideally more than 1 m deep. Yield is reduced when the irrigation water is highly saline. These soil and climate conditions are available only in a few areas of the world, particularly in southern Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Crete, the Levant, South Africa, Colombia, Peru, parts of central and northern Chile, Vietnam, Indonesia, parts of southern India, Sri Lanka, Australia, New Zealand, the Philippines, Malaysia, Central America, the Caribbean, Mexico, California, Arizona, Puerto Rico, New Mexico, Texas, Florida, Hawai'i, Ecuador and Rwanda. Each region has different types of cultivars.
Harvest, Commercial orchards produce an average of seven tonnes per hectare each year, with some orchards achieving 20 tonnes per hectare.[14] Biennial bearing can be a problem, with heavy crops in one year being followed by poor yields the next. The avocado tree does not tolerate freezing temperatures, and can be grown only in subtropical or tropical climates. There are several cold-hardy varieties planted in the region of Gainesville, Florida, which survive temperatures as low as 20 F with only minor leaf damage.[citation needed]
The avocado is a climacteric fruit (the banana is another), which means it matures on the tree, but ripens off the tree. Avocados used in commerce are picked hard and green and kept in coolers at 3.3 to 5.6 °C (38 to 42 °F) until they reach their final destination. Avocados must be mature to ripen properly. Avocados that fall off the tree ripen on the ground. Generally, the fruit is picked once it reaches maturity; Mexican growers pick Hass-variety avocados when they have more than 23% dry matter, and other producing countries have similar standards. Once picked, avocados ripen in a few days at room temperature (faster if stored with other fruits such as apples or bananas, because of the influence of ethylene gas). Some supermarkets sell pre-ripened avocados which have been treated with synthetic ethylene to hasten ripening. In some cases avocados can be left on the tree for several months, which is an advantage to commercial growers who seek the greatest return for their crop; but if the fruit remains unpicked for too long it falls to the ground.
Breeding, The species is only partially able to self-pollinate because of dichogamy in its flowering. This limitation, added to the long juvenile period, makes the species difficult to breed. Most cultivars are propagated via grafting, having originated from random seedling plants or minor mutations derived from cultivars. Modern breeding programs tend to use isolation plots where the chances of cross-pollination are reduced. That is the case for programs at the University of California, Riverside, as well as the Volcani Centre and the Instituto de Investigaciones Agropecuarias in Chile.
The avocado is unusual in that the timing of the male and female flower phases differs among cultivars. There are two flowering types, "A" and "B". "A" cultivar flowers open as female on the morning of the first day and close in late morning or early afternoon. Then they open as male in the afternoon of the second day. "B" varieties open as female on the afternoon of the first day, close in late afternoon and reopen as male the following morning.
* "A" cultivars: Hass, Gwen, Lamb Hass, Pinkerton, Reed.
* "B" cultivars: Fuerte, Sharwil, Zutano, Bacon, Ettinger, Sir Prize, Walter Hole.[16][17]
Certain cultivars, such as the Hass, have a tendency to bear well only in alternate years. After a season with a low yield, due to factors such as cold (which the avocado does not tolerate well), the trees tend to produce abundantly the next season. In addition, due to environmental circumstances during some years, seedless avocados may appear on the trees. Known in the avocado industry as "cukes", they are usually discarded commercially due to their small size.
Propagation, Avocados can be propagated by seed, taking roughly four to six years to bear fruit. The offspring is unlikely to be identical to the parent cultivar in fruit quality. Prime quality varieties are therefore propagated by grafting to rootstocks that are propagated by seed (seedling rootstocks) or by layering (clonal rootstocks). After about a year of growing in a greenhouse, the young rootstocks are ready to be grafted. Terminal and lateral grafting is normally used. The scion cultivar grows for another 6–12 months before the tree is ready to be sold. Clonal rootstocks are selected for tolerance of specific soil and disease conditions, such as poor soil aeration or resistance to the soil-borne disease (root rot) caused by Phytophthora. . [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Avocados on 12/31/2012]
For pictures, go to http://www.californiaavocado.com/
Recipes for using avocados are available at http://www.avocadocentral.com/
History of the avocado, It is evident from miscellaneous reports by Spanish Conquistadores that, at the time of the Spanish conquest, avocados were grown from northern Mexico south through Central America into north-western South America and south in the Andean region as far as Peru (where the avocado had been introduced shortly before the conquest), as well as into the Andean region of Venezuela.
The Aztecs used the avocado as a sex stimulant and the Aztec name for avocado was ahuacatl, meaning "testicle." In the pre-Incan city of Chanchan, archaeologists have unearthed a large water jar, dated around 900 A.D., in the shape of an avocado.
1518 - Martin Fernandez de Enciso (1470-1528), Spanish conquistador and cosmographer, wrote the first published record that describes the avocado in his book, Suma De Geografia Que Trata De Todas Las Partidas Del Mundo, as commonly grown near Santa Marta, Colombia. This was the first account in Spanish of the discoveries in the New World.
1519 -Spanish soldier of fortune Hernando Cortez (1485-1547) set foot in Mexico City, the first white man to do so. Cortez found that the avocado was a staple in the native diet
1526 - Fernandez de Oviedo (1478-1557), historian to the conquistadores, wrote the following on avocados trees he saw along the north coast of Colombia: "In the center of the fruit is a seed like a peeled chestnut. And between this and the rind is the part which is eaten, which is abundant, and is a paste similar to butter and of very good taste."
1550 - The Spanish name, Aguacate, was first used by Pedro de Cieza de Leon (1518-1554), Spanish conquistador and historian, in a journal of his travels written in 1550. He noted that at that time the avocado grew in Panama, Ecuador, Colombia, and Peru.
1554 - The first mention of the avocado as growing in Mexico, was made by Francisco Cervantes Salazar in 1554. In his book Crónica de la Nueva España (Chronicles of New Spain), he listed the avocado among fruits sold in the market of Tenochtitlan (the name for Mexico City at that time).
The Spanish conquistadors also discovered a unique use for the avocado seed. The seed yields a milky liquid that becomes red when exposed to air. The Spaniards found they could use this reddish brown or even blackish indelible liquid as ink to be used on documents. Some of these documents are still in existence today.
1672 -W. Hughes, physician to King Charles II of England, in his visit to Jamaica, wrote that the avocado was "One of the most rare and pleasant fruits of the island. It nourisheth and strengtheneth the body, corroborating the spirits and procuring lust exceedingly."
1700s - European sailors in the 1700s called it midshipman's butter because they liked to spread it on hardtack biscuits
1833 - Judge Henry Perrine planted the first avocado tree in Florida.
1856 -.The California State Agricultural Society Report for 1856 stated that Thomas J. White grew the avocado in Los Angeles.
1871 - In California, the first successful introduction of avocado trees was planted by Judge R. B. Ord of Santa Barbara, who secured the trees from Mexico in 1871.
1879 - The oldest living tree is found on the University of California, Berkeley campus and was planted in 1879.
1892 - In other southern California locations, avocados were planted by various people who introduced and planted seed from Mexico and Guatemala. In the early 1890's, Juan Murrieta of Los Angeles became interested in the avocado and imported a large amount of thick-skinned fruit from Atlixco, Mexico. He distributed some of the seeds of these fruits among his friends and planted the others. From this group of seedling trees, came a number of the varieties that first attracted attention as promising commercial fruits.
1895 - In 1895, Young Charles Delmonico and Ranhofer introduced New York to the "alligator pear." or avocado, which had been newly imported from South America. Ranhofer had known of the avocado -- he mentions the avocado in his book, The Epicurean, which he published the previous year -- but until 1895 he had been unable to secure a supply of the buttery fruit.
1911 - Frederick O. Popenoe, owner of the West Indian Gardens of Altadena, California, sent Carl Schmidt to Mexico (Mexico City, Puebla, and Atlixco) to search for avocados of outstanding quality and to locate the trees from which they came. Schmidt, who located what turned out to be the Fuerte as a dooryard tree in Atlixco, Mexico. Only one of the trees he brought back survived the great freeze of 1913 in California. This surviving tree was given the name Fuerte, Spanish for "vigorous." Schmidt said, "Two years later came the big freeze. In the spring when we began to take stock of damage, it was the Fuerte that came through and it was the only avocado that survived. It thus proved itself adaptable to our temperatures." [source - retrieved from http://whatscookingamerica.net/avacado.htm on 12/31/2012]
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bael fruit

Post  Admin on Sat Jan 12, 2013 3:09 pm


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the bael fruit, Aegle marmelos Correa (syns. Feronia pellucida Roth., Crataeva marmelos L.), is also called Bengal quince, Indian quince, golden apple, holy fruit, stone apple, bel, bela, sirphal, maredoo and other dialectal names in India; matum and mapin in Thailand; phneou or pnoi in Cambodia; bau nau in Vietnam; bilak, or maja pahit in Malaya; modjo in Java; oranger du Malabar in French; marmelos in Portuguese. Sometimes it is called elephant apple, which causes confusion with a related fruit of that name, Feronia limonia Swingle (q.v.).

The bael fruit tree is slow-growing, of medium size, up to 40 or 50 ft (12-15 m) tall with short trunk, thick, soft, flaking bark, and spreading, sometimes spiny branches, the lower ones drooping. Young suckers bear many stiff, straight spines. A clear, gummy sap, resembling gum arabic, exudes from wounded branches and hangs down in long strands, becoming gradually solid. It is sweet at first taste and then irritating to the throat. The deciduous, alternate leaves, borne singly or in 2's or 3's, are composed of 3 to 5 oval, pointed, shallowly toothed leaflets, 1 1/2 to 4 in (4-10 cm) long, 3/4 to 2 in (2-5 cm) wide, the terminal one with a long petiole. New foliage is glossy and pinkish-maroon. Mature leaves emit a disagreeable odor when bruised. Fragrant flowers, in clusters of 4 to 7 along the young branchlets, have 4 recurved, fleshy petals, green outside, yellowish inside, and 50 or more greenish-yellow stamens. The fruit, round, pyriform, oval, or oblong, 2 to 8 in (5-20 cm) in diameter, may have a thin, hard, woody shell or a more or less soft rind, gray-green until the fruit is fully ripe, when it turns yellowish. It is dotted with aromatic, minute oil glands. Inside, there is a hard central core and 8 to 20 faintly defined triangular segments, with thin, dark-orange walls, filled with aromatic, pale-orange, pasty, sweet, resinous, more or less astringent, pulp. Embedded in the pulp are 10 to 15 seeds, flattened-oblong, about 3/8 in (1 cm) long, bearing woolly hairs and each enclosed in a sac of adhesive, transparent mucilage that solidifies on drying. [source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/bael_fruit.html on 12/31/2012]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Origin and Distribution
The tree grows wild in dry forests on hills and plains of central and southern India and Burma, Pakistan and Bangladesh, also in mixed deciduous and dry dipterocarp forests of former French Indochina. Mention has been found in writings dating back to 800 B.C. It is cultivated throughout India, mainly in temple gardens, because of its status as a sacred tree; also in Ceylon and northern Malaya, the drier areas of Java, and to a limited extent on northern Luzon in the Philippine Islands where it first fruited in 1914. It is grown in some Egyptian gardens, and in Surinam and Trinidad. Seeds were sent from Lahore to Dr. Walter T. Swingle in 1909 (P.I. No. 24450). Specimens have been maintained in citrus collections in Florida and in agriculture research stations but the tree has never been grown for its fruit in this state except by Dr. David Fairchild at his home, the "Kampong", in Coconut Grove, after he acquired a taste for it, served with jaggery (palm sugar), in Ceylon.
Climate

The bael fruit tree is a subtropical species. In the Punjab, it grows up to an altitude of 4,000 ft (1,200 m) where the temperature rises to 120º F (48.89º C) in the shade in summer and descends to 20º F (-6.67º C) in the winter, and prolonged droughts occur. It will not fruit where there is no long, dry season, as in southern Malaya.

Soil
The bael fruit is said to do best on rich, well-drained soil, but it has grown well and fruited on the oolitic limestone of southern Florida. According to L. B. Singh (1961), it "grows well in swampy, alkaline or stony soils". . . "grows luxuriantly in the soils having pH range from 5 to 8". In India it has the reputation of thriving where other fruit trees cannot survive.

Varieties
One esteemed, large cultivar with thin rind and few seeds is known as 'Kaghzi'. Dr. L.B. Singh and co-workers at the Horticultural Research Institute, Saharanpur, India, surveyed bael fruit trees in Uttar Padesh, screened about 100 seedlings, selected as the most promising for commercial planting: 'Mitzapuri', 'Darogaji', 'Ojha', 'Rampuri', 'Azamati', 'Khamaria'. Rated the best was 'Mitzapuri', with very thin rind, breakable with slight pressure of the thumb, pulp of fine texture, free of gum, of excellent flavor, and containing few seeds.

S.K. Roy, in 1975, reported on the extreme variability of 24 cultivars collected in Agra, Calcutta, Delhi and Varanasi. He decided that selections should be made for high sugar content and low levels of mucilage, tannin and other phenolics.
Only the small, hard-shelled type is known in Florida and this has to be sawed open, cracked with a hammer, or flung forcefully against a rock. Fruits of this type are standard for medicinal uses rather than for consuming as normal food.

Propagation
The bael fruit is commonly grown from seed in nurseries and transplanted into the field. Seedlings show great variation in form, size, texture of rind, quantity and quality of pulp and number of seeds. The flavor ranges from disagreeable to pleasant. Therefore, superior types must be multiplied vegetatively. L.B. Singh achieved 80% to 95% success in 1954 when he budded 1-month-old shoots onto 2-year-old seedling bael rootstocks in the month of June. Experimental shield-budding onto related species of Afraegle and onto Swinglea glutinosa Merr. has been successful. Occasionally, air-layers or root cuttings have been used for propagation.

Culture
The tree has no exacting cultural requirements, doing well with a minimum of fertilizer and irrigation. The spacing in orchards is 25 to 30 ft (6-9 m) between trees. Seedlings begin to bear in 6 to 7 years, vegetatively propagated trees in 5 years. Full production is reached in 15 years. In India flowering occurs in April and May soon after the new leaves appear and the fruit ripens in 10 to 11 months from bloom–March to June of the following year.

Harvesting
Normally, the fruit is harvested when yellowish-green and kept for 8 days while it loses its green tint. Then the stem readily separates from the fruit. The fruits can be harvested in January (2 to 3 months before full maturity) and ripened artificially in 18 to 24 days by treatment with 1,000 to 1,500 ppm ethrel (2-chloroethane phosphonic acid) and storage at 86º F (30º C). Care is needed in harvesting and handling to avoid causing cracks in the rind.
A tree may yield as many as 800 fruits in a season but an average crop is 150 to 200, or, in the better cultivars, up to 400. [source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/bael_fruit.html on 12/31/2012]

How this tree and other plants absorb water from the ground. Plants have developed an effective system to absorb, translocate, store, and utilize water. Plants contain a vast network of conduits, which consists of xylem and phloem tissues. These conducting tissues start in the roots and continue up through the trunks of trees, into the branches and then into every leaf. Phloem tissue is made of living elongated cells that are connected to one another and responsible for translocating nutrients and sugars (carbohydrates), which are produced by leaves for energy and growth. The xylem is also composed of elongated cells but once the cells are formed, they die. The walls of the xylem cells still remain intact and serve as an excellent peipline to transport water from the roots to the leaves.

The main driving force of water uptake and transport into a plant is transpiration of water from leaves through specialized openings called stomata. Heat from the sun causes the water to evaporate, setting this ‘water chain’ in motion. The evaporation creates a negative water vapor pressure. Water is pulled into the leaf to replace the water that has transpired from the leaf. This pulling of water, or tension, occurs in the xylem of the leaf. Since the xylem is a continuous water column that extends from the leaf to the roots, this negative water pressure extends into the roots and results in water uptake from the soil. [adapted from: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=follow-up-how-do-trees-ca ]

Clearly this clever water transport system shows a superior intelligence of the Creator (YHWH).


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