Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

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The Chrysobalanus icaco, the cocoplum,

Post  Admin on Wed Nov 27, 2013 10:58 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Chrysobalanus icaco, the cocoplum, Paradise Plum and icaco, is found near sea beaches and inland throughout the tropical Americas and the Caribbean, including Cuba, southern Florida, and the Bahamas. The inland subspecies is Chrysobalanus icaco pellocarpus.

Chrysobalanus icaco is a shrub 1–3 metres (3.3–9.8 ft), or bushy tree 2–6 metres (6.6–20 ft), rarely to 10 metres (33 ft). It has evergreen broad-oval to nearly round somewhat leathery leaves (3 to 10 cm long and 2.5 to 7 cm wide). Leaf colors range from green to light red. The bark is greyish or reddish brown, with white specks.

The flowers are small, white, in clusters, appearing in late spring. In late summer it bears fruit in clusters, that of the coastal form being round, up to 5 cm in diameter, pale-yellow with rose blush or dark-purple in color, while that of the inland form is oval, up to 2.5 cm long, and dark-purple.
The coastal form is highly tolerant of salt, so it is often planted to stabilize beach edges and prevent erosion.

Chrysobalanus icaco is also planted as an ornamental shrub. The tree is unable to survive a hard frost. The fruit is edible and is used for jam. The common name for this fruit in Trinidad & Tobago and Guyana is "fat pork". [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coco_Plum on 1/02/2013]
This is a very rugged plant and can be used to make an almost maintenance free hedge, even near salt water.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

* Coco plum plants usually grow in a shrub formation, but they may also form small trees. The stems are gray or brown, and twigs appear green and change to deep red as they mature. Coco plum leaves are dark-green, shiny and slightly under 1 inch long. Tiny, light-green flowers are almost unnoticeable.

* Coco plum fruit ranges from white to purple and although it is edible, it is nearly tasteless when fully ripe. The shape of the fruit resembles plums, giving this shrub its common name. [source - retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/facts_7640078_information-coco-plum-plant.html on 1/05/2013]

To see a picture of this shrub, go to http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/coco_plum.htm

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sun Dec 01, 2013 12:32 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Common Grape Vitis vinifera

Vitis vinifera is also called Common Grape Vine and is a species of Vitis, native to the Mediterranean region, central Europe, and southwestern Asia, from Morocco and Spain north to southern Germany and east to northern Iran. It is a liana growing to 35 m tall. It holds on to supports with twining tendrils.
An interesting climber with green leaves covered with silvery down. This plant is ideal for color compositions with shrubs, other climbers or trees with dark leaves or flowers. The leaves are alternate, palmate and lobed, about 5–20 cm long and broad.

The flowers of the vine are of color yellow-green and are gathered in bunches. They are intensely fragrant, hermaphrodites (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by insects. Since it has both sexes, you need only one plant to be able to enjoy the fruits. The flowers will bloom from May to July.
The sweet edible fruit is a berry, known as a grape; in the wild species it is 6 mm diameter and ripens dark purple to blackish with a pale wax bloom; in cultivated plants it is usually much larger, up to 3 cm long, and can be green, red, or purple. Fruits ripen from September to October.

Hardiness zones: 6-10 (-20°C/-5°F, 1°C/35°F) in winter. Tolerating temperatures down to about -20°c. Best grown in fertile, moist but permeable soil that is rich in calcium, but it will also succeed moderate soil. This vine does best in calcium rich fertile loamy evenly moist soils for best production and flavorful fruit. It likes sunny, warm and well-aerated spots. When grown in shade, the leaves turn green. It can freeze during severe winters. The species typically occurs in humid forests and stream sides.

Note: These seeds need to be cold statified before sowing. (source - retrieved from http://www.seedman.com/fruit.htm on //2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

View of plant on side of a house at, http://www.hgtvgardens.com/flowers-and-plants/common-grape-vitis-vinifera-purpurea

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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Dec 04, 2013 11:28 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Cordia.

Cordia

Cordia boissieri in bloom
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Plantae
(unranked):
Angiosperms
(unranked):
Eudicots
(unranked):
Asterids
Order:
(unplaced)
Family:
Boraginaceae
Subfamily:
Cordioideae
Genus:
Cordia
L.
Type species
Cordia myxa
L.[1]
Species
See text
Synonyms
Cerdana Ruiz & Pav.

2]
Cordia is a genus of flowering plants in the borage family, Boraginaceae. It contains about 300 species of shrubs and trees, which are found worldwide mostly in warmer regions. Many of the species are commonly called manjack, while bocote may refer to several Central American species in Spanish. The generic name honours German botanist and pharmacist Valerius Cordus (1515-1544).[3] Like most other Boraginaceae, a majority have trichomes (hairs) on the leaves.

Ornamental
Many Cordias have fragrant, showy flowers and are popular in gardens, although they are not especially hardy.[4]

As food
A number of the tropical species have edible fruits, known by a wide variety of names including clammy cherries, glue berries, sebesten, or snotty gobbles. In India, the fruits of local species are used as a vegetable, raw, cooked, or pickled, and are known by many names, including lasora in Hindi. One such species is Fragrant Manjack (C. dichotoma), which is called gunda or tenti dela in Hindi and lasura in Nepali. The fruit of the Fragrant Manjack is called phoà-pò•-chí (???), ???, or ??(POJ: chhi?-chí) in Taiwan where they are eaten pickled.

Wood
The wood of several Cordia species is commercially harvested. Ecuador Laurel (C. alliodora), Ziricote (C. dodecandra), Spanish Elm (C. gerascanthus), and C. goeldiana are used to make furniture and doors in Central and South America.[4]
Ziricote[5] and Bocote[6] are sometimes used as a wood for making acoustic guitar backs and sides. Well-known guitarist Richard Thompson currently plays a Lowden F-35C RT Richard Thompson Signature Model with Ziricote back and sides.[7] Similarly, drums are made from C. abyssinica, C. millenii, and C. platythrysa due to the resonance of the wood.[8]

Ecology
Cordia species are used as food plants by the caterpillars of some Lepidoptera species, such as Endoclita malabaricus, Bucculatrix caribbea, and Bucculatrix cordiaella.[9] The Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle (Physonota alutacea) feeds on C. boissieri, C. dentata, C. inermis, and C. macrostachya.[10]

Selected species
* Cordia africana Lam. – White Manjack
* Cordia alliodora (Ruiz & Pav.) Oken – Spanish Elm, Ecuador Laurel, Salmwood, Bocote (Neotropics)[11]
* Cordia angustifolia (West ex Willd.) Roemer & J.A.Schultes – Basora
* Cordia bahamensis Urban – Bahama Manjack
* Cordia bellonis Urban – Serpentine Manjack
* Cordia boissieri A.DC. – Anacahuita, Texas Olive (southern Texas, Northern Mexico)
* Cordia borinquensis Urban – Capá, Muneco (Puerto Rico)[11]
* Cordia buddeloides
* Cordia collococca L. – Red Manjack (Neotropics)[11]
* Cordia crenata
* Cordia croatii
* Cordia curassavica (Jacq.) Roem. & Schult. – Black Sage, Wild Sage
* Cordia dentata Poir. – White Manjack
* Cordia dichotoma G.Forst – Fragrant Manjack, Bird Lime Tree (Tropical Asia and Australasia)[12]
* Cordia dodecandra DC. – Ziricote (Southern Mexico, northern Central America, Cuba)[11]
* Cordia eleagnoides DC. (Mexico)[11]
* Cordia gerascanthus L. – Yauco, Spanish Elm, Laurel Negro, Baria
* Cordia globosa (Jacq.) Kunth – Bloodberry, Butterfly Sage, Curaciao Bush
* Cordia guanacastensis
* Cordia holstii
* Cordia kingstonia
* Cordia laevigata Lam. – Smooth Manjack (Central America, Caribbean)[11]
* Cordia lima – Lija
* Cordia linnaei Stearn.
* Cordia lutea
* Cordia macleodii
* Cordia martinicensis
* Cordia millenii Baker
* Cordia myxa L. – Assyrian Plum (South Asia)
* Cordia nesophila I.M.Johnst. (Lesser Antilles)[11]
* Cordia nitida – Red Manjack, Indian Cherry
* Cordia nodosa
* Cordia obliqua Willd. – Clammy Cherry
* Cordia panamensis L.Riley (Southern Mexico, Central America, northern South America)[11]
* Cordia parvifolia A.DC. – Small-leaf Geigertree
* Cordia platythyrsa Baker
* Cordia podocephala Torr. – Texas Manjack
* Cordia polycephala (Lam.) I.M.Johnst. – Black-sage
* Cordia rickseckeri Millsp. – Black Manjack, Orange Manjack, San Bartolomé
* Cordia rupicola Urban – Puerto Rico Manjack (Puerto Rico)
* Cordia sebestena L. – Geiger Tree, Large-leaf Geigertree (southern Florida, Greater Antilles, Central America)
* Cordia sinensis Lam. (=C. gharaf) – Grey-leafed Saucerberry
* Cordia subcordata Lam. – Kou, Tou, Marer (Africa, South Asia, Southeast Asia, northern Australia, Pacific Islands)
* Cordia sulcata DC. – Mucilage Manjack, Laylay, White Manjack, Wild Clammy Cherry
* Cordia thaisiana
* Cordia trichotoma (Vell.) Arráb. ex Steud. – Letiribí
* Cordia wagneriorum R.A.Howard – Luquillo Mountain Manjack[13][14][15]
Formerly placed here
* Carmona retusa (Vahl) Masam. (as C. retusa Vahl)[14]
Gallery
*
C. sinensis foliage and fruit.
*
C. sinensis trees.

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cordia


Wikispecies has information related to: Cordia
1. ^ "Cordia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2009-10-20.
2. ^ "Cordia L.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2007-10-05. Retrieved 2010-03-01.
3. ^ Quattrocchi, Umberto (2000). CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names: A-C. CRC Press. pp. 612–613. ISBN 978-0-8493-2675-2.
4. ^ a b Bennett, Masha (2003). Pulmonarias and the Borage Family. Timber Press. pp. 196–198. ISBN 978-0-88192-589-0.
5. ^ http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts.asp?CategoryName=+Backs+and+Sides&NameProdHeader=Ziricote Luthiers Mercantile page about Ziricote
6. ^ http://www.lmii.com/CartTwo/thirdproducts.asp?CategoryName=+Backs+and+Sides&NameProdHeader=Bocote Luthiers Mercantile page about Ziricote
7. ^ Presad, Anil (October 2009). "Richard Thompson" (PDF). Guitar Player: 50.
8. ^ Tudge, Colin (2007). The Tree. Random House. p. 237. ISBN 978-0-307-39539-9.
9. ^ Davis, Donald R.; Bernard Landry; Lazaro Roque-albelo (2002). "Two new Neotropical species of Bucculatrix leaf miners (Lepidoptera: Bucculatricidae) reared from Cordia (Boraginaceae)". Revue Suisse de Zoologie 109 (2): 277–294.
10. ^ Quinn, Mike. "Wild Olive Tortoise Beetle Physonota alutacea Boheman, 1854". Texas Beetle Information. Texas Entomology. Retrieved 2010-04-05.
11. ^ a b c d e f g h Grandtner, Miroslav M. (2005). Elsevier's Dictionary of Trees 1. Elsevier. pp. 252–260. ISBN 978-0-444-51784-5.
12. ^ "Cordia dichotoma Forst. f.". Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Plant Growth Facilities. University of Connecticut. 2009-10-06. Retrieved 2009-10-20.
13. ^ "Subordinate Taxa of Cordia L.". TROPICOS. Missouri Botanical Garden. Retrieved 2009-10-20.
14. ^ a b "Species Records of Cordia". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-08-21.
15. ^ "Cordia". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 1 March 2010. (source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clammy_cherry on 3/29/2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

View plant and fruit at, http://www.barbadospocketguide.com/our-island-barbados/plants/trees/clammy-cherry-trees.html


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Your Friend in Christ Iris89

Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!



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the Cornelian Cherry

Post  Admin on Sun Dec 08, 2013 10:02 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Cornelian Cherry is a member of the Cornus (Dogwood) family which produces an edible fruit with acidic flavors similar to the cranberry and sour cherry. The fruit is a red drupe, which is mainly used in jams but can be eaten dried. The habit of the plant is a medium to large shrub or small tree. The Cornelian Cherry is also known as Cornus mas or European Cornel.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

The Cornelian Cherry Dogwood is native to central and southern Europe, and to Asia. It probably was introduced into this country before 1800. Several varieties have been developed since its introduction. This tree grows well in a variety of soils and is tolerant of soil conditions. In the Midwestern United States it reportedly is the longest-lived kind of dogwood tree. Some people grow this dogwood as a hedge, in which case it produces a dense, almost impenetrable thicket of branches. It also can be grown as a large shrub. The Cornelian Cherry Dogwood is relatively free from insect pests and diseases. Some birds feed on the fruit of this tree. [source - retrieved from http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact%20pages/dogwood_cornelian_cherry/dogwood_cornelian_cherry.html on 12/10/2012] . Unlike most other dogwood trees, the Cornelian Cherry, produces edible fruit with a rather pleasing taste and grow quite well in most areas other than the extreme south and/or north .in North America, i.e., U.S.D.A. Hardiness Zones 3 to 8.
Cornelian Cherry like a sunny location with good soil drainage. Water regularly and deeply for the first year, especially during dry periods. Fertilize with an all purpose fertilizer before the plant comes out of dormancy in the spring. Adding mulch annually reduces weeds and preserves moisture. Prune annually to remove old and dead wood and to encourage new growth. Fruit is usually borne on new growth. Most Cornelian Cherry varieties have clusters of small yellow flowers before the leaves open,

Pictures of Cornelian Cherry tree are available at http://www.oplin.org/tree/fact%20pages/dogwood_cornelian_cherry/dogwood_cornelian_cherry.html

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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today!


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Thu Dec 12, 2013 12:12 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Cotopriz – Yellow Genip, this tree is Talisia is a genus of 52 species of flowering plants in the soapberry family, Sapindaceae, native to tropical regions of the Americas. The genus is closely related to Melicoccus, with some species sometimes included in that genus.
The species are evergreen trees and shrubs growing to 20 m tall, with pinnate leaves. The flowers are individually inconspicuous, produced in panicles. The fruit is an oval drupe 2-4 cm long containing one or two seeds surrounded by a translucent crisp, juicy layer of fruit pulp and a thin orange or brown skin; in several species the fruit pulp is edible. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talisia on 1/04/2013]
CAUTION: Never eat any member of the Talisia species before determining if it is a variety that is edible. Little information is available on the toxicity of various members of this family.


In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

A picture of one member of this species can be seen at http://chalk.richmond.edu/flora-kaxil-kiuic/m/melicoccus_olivaeformis.html

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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sun Dec 15, 2013 12:55 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the cotopriz, Talisia oliviformis. Common Name: Canip. This is a fruit tree that can grow up to 20 feet high. Native to Belize, Central America and northern South America. This fruit is an extremely popular fruit that is eagerly consumed by children and commonly sold in markets. Easy to grow from seed; the seeds will germinate in 30 to 60 days and the plants will bloom and produce fruit in three to four years.

It is rather dangerous for small children to eat due to the danger of the large seed slipping down the throat while eating the good tasting pulp around it and chocking the child..

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

It grows in most soils, but prefers a slightly acid PH.

(NOTE- Anyone having more information on this tree, please post.)

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Your Friend in Christ Iris89

Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!



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the Anonodium mannii (Junglesop)

Post  Admin on Tue Dec 17, 2013 11:54 pm


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Anonodium mannii (Junglesop) is a fast growing tropical African tree, that grows to 8-30m high, with a girth of up to 2m.[1] It has 20–40 cm long leaves and large flowers which produce edible fruits generally around 4–6 kg, but which can be up to around 15 kg. Fruit flavor is rich but variable and is sometimes described as an acquired taste, though the fruits are generally in high demand in Africa, with large fruits commanding high prices. The fruit is a favorite with local people (who refer to it as "bobo"[2]) and primates, especially bonobos.

Fruit
After approximately 10 years, junglesops begin to produce fruit seasonally. Normally around 5 kg, some are up to 15 kg, making the junglesop not only the largest of the Annonaceae but one of the largest fruits in the world, though not as large as the jackfruit or Telfairia pedata. Inside the tough, leathery brown skin patterned with raised diamond-shapes is a soft yellow-orange pulp with a somewhat peachy but unique flavor ranging from sweet to sour depending upon the genetic qualities of the tree concerned and upon its ripeness when harvested.[3] Some fruits do not taste good, but its rich flavor appeals to most palates and it is rich in Vitamin A.

Cultivation
Recommended cultivation distance is 8 meters square, and planting several trees together is recommended to ensure good pollination. Trees reportedly prefer a rich, acidic and moist but well drained soil.[4] As an understory tree, it is shade tolerant, but susceptible to wind damage. Attempts at cultivation have also been hampered by insect attack[1] and fungal diseases.[3]
Where it occurs naturally, the tree is not generally cultivated, possibly due to the availability of the fruit from wild trees, possibly due to the fact that although fast growing, trees take so long to bear fruit.

Distribution
The natural range of the junglesop is jungles of central Africa, including the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo, the Central African Republic, Angola, Zambia, Ghana, Nigeria, Gabon and Cameroon. As well as in lowland rainforests, it grows on fringing forest and adjacent savanna especially next to rivers, provided the soil is well drained.[4]
It has also been planted in Hawaii, Malaysia and Australia, but has not yet set fruit.[5] A single tree is known to be growing in the continental US, in the Miami garden of pomologistBill Whitman, though it too has never fruited.[6]

External links
* Species listing on Tropicos.org
1. ^ Jump up to:a b Useful plants of Bas-Congo province, DR Congo (2004)
2. Jump up^ http://www.voanews.com/content/a-13-2009-05-28-voa51-68825652/413874.html
3. ^ Jump up to:a b Lost Crops of Africa: Vol. III: Fruits
4. ^ Jump up to:a b "Congo Native Fruits" by Danforth & Noren, 1998
5. Jump up^ http://www.fruitipedia.com/junglesop_anonidium_manonii.htm
6. Jump up^ http://www.tropicsphere.com/main/forums/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=4359
[source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anonidium_mannii on 12/16/2013]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].


To view fruit, go to, https://www.google.com/search?q=Anonidium+mannii&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=DaSvUuOYLYTDtAaR-4G4Dw&ved=0CDIQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=935

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Dec 21, 2013 9:07 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the capsicum rhomboideum, a.k.a. Capsicum ciliatum, Witheringia ciliatum

A very exotic and rare wild pepper bearing tiny, pea size red fruits without heat. This species is noteworthy as one of the remaining primitive wild peppers, an almost living fossil and part of a group of possible forebearers of the more common domesticated species.

Description
A small shrub that can grow as high as six feet though usually remains much smaller. Growth is more or less upright, somewhat compact. Compared with the common Capsicum's, this species barely looks like a pepper. Leaves are rounded, hairy and unlike common peppers in appearance. Flowers are bright yellow, with a general bell shape, but a distinctive Capsicum-like arrangement of stamens and pistils. The tiny berry fruits may follow flowering and ripen to red. Fruits are attached to a prominent five pronged calyx. The seeds are dark brown-black. C. rhomboideum is also of note for having 13 chromosome pairs (2n=26)---a trait shared with several extremely rare, primitive wild peppers. All domesticated and virtually all common wild peppers contain just 12 chromosome pairs (2n=24).
Hardiness Unknown.

Growing Environment
Of the very rare wild Capsicum's, this species is one of the easiest to grow. It does well in a range of conditions, though it should be watered fairly regularly during growing months. Grows well in filtered and full sun. Thrives in humid conditions, but test plantings have done fine in drier air as well.
Propagation
By seeds. The seeds can be difficult to sprout but using normal pepper germinating procedures generally shows good results.
Uses
The fruits are said to be edible with no heat and a very subtle sweetness. Rarely cultivated but in demand both as a curiosity and an ornamental amongst collectors.
Native Range
Native from Southern Mexico through Venezuela and Northern Peru. [SOURCE - RETRIEVED FROM http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/content/capsicum-rhomboideum.htm ON 12/15/2013]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

To see pictures and more details, go to http://www.fatalii.net/Chile_Peppers/Species/C_rhomboideum

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Dec 25, 2013 1:08 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the The Peruvian Apple Cactus, Cereus repandus, is a large, erect, thorny columnar cactus found in South America as well as the nearbyABC Islands of the Dutch Caribbean. It is also known as Giant Club Cactus, Hedge Cactus, cadushi, (in Wayuunaiki[1]) and kayush.

With an often tree-like appearance, the Peruvian Apple Cactus' cylindrical gray-green to blue stems can reach 10 metres (33 ft) in height and 10–20 cm in diameter. The nocturnal flowers remain open for only one night. The fruits, known locally as "pitaya" or Peruvian Apple, are thornless and vary in skin colour from violet-red to yellow. The edible flesh is white and contains small, edible, crunchy seeds. The flesh sweetens as the fruit opens out fully.

Cereus repandus is an unresearched, under-utilized cactus, grown mostly as an ornamental plant. As noted above, it has some local culinary importance. The Wayuu from the La Guajira Peninsula of Colombia and Venezuela also use the inner cane-like wood of the plant in wattle and daub construction.[1] [FOOTNOTE - ^ Jump up to:a b Villalobos et al. (2007)] [SOURCE - RETRIEVED FROM http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cereus_repandus ON 12/15/2013]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

To see pictures of the fruit and the cactus, go to https://www.google.com/search?q=Cereus+repandus&sa=N&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ei=zEeuUtSdGebJygPF14CgAg&ved=0CCkQsAQ4Cg&biw=1280&bih=935

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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Dec 28, 2013 6:53 pm


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the kola tree and the kola nut is the fruit of the kola tree, a genus (Cola) of trees native to the tropical rainforests of Africa. The caffeine-containing fruit of the tree is sometimes used as a flavoring ingredient in beverages, and is the origin of the term "cola".

General description
Cola acuminata
Kola nut is a caffeine-containing nut of evergreen trees of the genus Cola, primarily the species Cola acuminata and Cola nitida.[1] Cola acuminata is an evergreen tree of about 20 meters in height, and has long, ovoid leaves pointed at both the ends with a leathery texture. The trees have yellow flowers with purple spots, and star-shaped fruit. Inside the fruit, about a dozen round or square seeds can be found in a white seed shell. The nut’s aroma is sweet and rose-like. The first taste is bitter, but sweetens upon chewing. The nut can be boiled to extract the cola. This tree reaches 25 meters in height and is propagated through seeds. C. nitida and C. acuminata can easily be interchanged with other Cola species.

Uses
The kola nut has a bitter flavor and contains caffeine. It is chewed in many West African cultures, individually or in a group setting. It is often used ceremonially, presented to chiefs or presented to guests.[2] It is preferred among African Muslims, who are forbidden to drink alcohol. Chewing kola nut can ease hunger pangs. Kola nuts are often used to treat whooping cough and asthma. The caffeine present acts as a bronchodilator, expanding the bronchial air passages. Frequent chewing of the kola nut can also lead to stained teeth. Among the urban youth of West Africa, kola nut is becoming less popular.

Kola nuts are perhaps best known to Western culture as a flavouring ingredient and one of the sources of caffeine in cola and other similarly flavoured beverages, although the use of kola (or kola flavoring) in commercial cola drinks has become uncommon.

History
The use of the kola nut, like the coffee berry and tea leaf, appears to have ancient origins. It is chewed in many West African cultures, individually or in a social setting, to restore vitality and ease hunger pangs. Kola nuts are an important part of the traditional spiritual practice of culture and religion in West Africa, particularly Nigeria.[3] Kola nuts are used as a religious object and sacred offering during prayers, ancestor veneration, and significant life events, such as naming ceremonies, weddings, and funerals. They are also used in a traditional divination system called Obi divination. For this use, only kola nuts divided into four lobes are suitable. They are cast upon a special wooden board and the resulting patterns are read by a trained diviner.[4] This ancient practice is currently enjoying increased growth within the United States and Caribbean.

In the 1800s, a pharmacist in Georgia, John Pemberton, took extracts of kola and coca and mixed them with sugar, other ingredients, and carbonated water to invent the first colasoft drink. His accountant tasted it and called it "Coca-Cola". Cocaine (not the other extracts from the Peruvian coca leaf) was prohibited from soft drinks in the U.S. after 1904, and Coca-Cola no longer uses kola nor cocaine in its original recipe.[5]

Worldwide kola nut yield
Originally a tree of tropical rainforest, it needs a hot humid climate, but can withstand a dry season on sites with a high ground water level. It may be cultivated in drier areas where ground water is available. C. nitida is a shade bearer, but develops a better spreading crown which yields more fruits in open places. Though it is a lowland forest tree, it has been found at altitudes over 300 m on deep, rich soils under heavy and evenly distributed rainfall.

Regular weeding is a must and can either be done manually or by using herbicides. Some irrigation can be provided to the plants, but it is important to remove the water through an effective drainage system, as excess water may prove to be detrimental for the growth of the plant. When not grown in adequate shade, the kola nut plant responds well to fertilizers. Usually, the plants need to be provided with windbreaks to protect them from strong gales.

Kola nuts can be harvested mechanically or by hand, by plucking them at the tree branch. When kept in a cool, dry place, kola nuts can be stored for a long time.

Pests and diseases
The nuts are subject to attack by the kola weevil Balanogastris cola. The larvae of the moth Characoma strictigrapta that also attacks cacao bore into the nuts. Traders sometimes apply an extract of the bark of Rauvolfia vomitoria or the pulverised fruits of Xylopia and Capsicum to counteract the attack on nursery plants. The cacao pests Sahlbergella spp. have been found also on C. nitida as an alternative host plant. While seeds are liable to worm attack, the wood is subject to borer attack.

Chemical composition
* caffeine (2–3.5%)
* theobromine (1.0–2.5%)
* theophylline
* phenolics
* phlobaphens (kola red)
* epicatechin
* D-catechin
* tannic acid
* sugar
* cellulose
* water

References
* Jarvis, Gail (May 21, 2002). The Rise and Fall of Cocaine Cola. Retrieved on 2006-08-19.
* Kim, Katherine, (2001). Encyclopedia of Alternative Medicine
* Mariama Bâ, "So Long a Letter"
Footnotes
1. Jump up^ Burdock, George A.; Carabin, Ioana G.; Crincoli, Christine M. (August 2009). "Food and Chemical Toxicology". Safety assessment of kola nut extract as a food ingredient (Elsevier) 47(Cool: 1725–1732. doi:10.1016/j.fct.2009.04.019.
2. Jump up^ Igbo insight guide to Enugu and Igboland's Culture and Language, igboguide.org Kola Nut
3. Jump up^ FAMA Aina Adewale-Somadhi, Chief: (2004), "Practitioner's Handbook for the IFA Professional", Ile Orunmila Communications, p. 1
4. Jump up^ Epega, Afolabi A.: (2003), "Obi Divination", Athelia Henrietta Press, pgs 1-2
5. Jump up^ Catherine Meyers (6 May 2011). "How Natural Is Your Cola?". Science NOW. Retrieved 2011-05-08. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kola_nut on 12/15/2013]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

To see pictures of the fruit and tree, go to https://www.google.com/search?q=Cola+acuminata&sa=N&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&ei=TEyuUrL7EuTMygOl2oDACQ&ved=0CCkQsAQ4Cg&biw=1280&bih=935

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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!



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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Jan 01, 2014 10:58 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Couepia longipendula (Egg nut)

The Couepia longipendula (egg nut) is interesting because of its excellent flavor. This large tree is common in the forest around Manaus but although widely eaten in the rural areas, it never reaches the local market so is little known. The shell is hard and thick requiring an ax to break it. Nuts with thinner shells are said to exist in the forest. Trees are rather slow growing so grafting onto the more vigorous rootstock of C. subcordata is being considered (FAO 1986). The kernels are rich in oil which appears to have some unusual polyunsaturated fatty acids. (source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1990/v1-367.html on 3/29/2013)

The tropical rainforest tree Couepia longipendula is known by the common names egg nut, castanha de galinha, and pendula nut. It is found in the Amazon.
Its nuts are used as a food source in rural South America, especially in Brazil. The nuts are useful for their oil. (source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Couepia_longipendula on 3/29/2013)
In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

No pictures available.

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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Jan 04, 2014 11:34 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Couma utilis (Sorva)

Over 5000 t of sorva latex are exported from this plant each year as a substitute for chicle gum. Much of it is obtained by destructive tapping of wild trees. Because these are being decimated quickly, Achras sapota trees are slow growing and increasingly rare and industrial substitutes are contaminated with heavy metals, there is considerable interest in establishing plantations of C. utilis. A few experimental trees have grown very fast on poor soil but tapping yields have not been obtained yet. The tree is also very decorative and the good flavored fruit are sold in local markets. The fruit might become a useful subproduct of latex plantations, however, they are too soft and not thought to be interesting enough to consider more seriously in their own right (FAO 1986). (source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1990/v1-367.html on 3/29/2013)

Small, round fruit, looking somewhat like a guava, with an edible sweet pulp. The versatile tree is also a source of latex, used for a variety of industrial purposes.
Description: sized tree from 15-50+ feet tall.

Propagation: By seeds.
Uses: Fruit is eaten fresh. Tree latex is eaten to treat diarrhea, worms and parasites and is used to flavor drinks (sorva). The latex is also used in making chewing gum, glue, varnish, caulk, and other industrial products. (source - retrieved from http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/sorva.htm on 3/29/2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

View plant and fruit in a single picture at, http://www.microsofttranslator.com/bv.aspx?ref=SERP&br=ro&mkt=en-US&dl=en&lp=PT_EN&a=http%3a%2f%2fpt.wikipedia.org%2fwiki%2fSorva

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Jan 11, 2014 2:10 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Cuphea spp.

The several hundred widely spread species in this genus have been of interest for about a decade, because of the unique composition of their seed oils. This varies with species, with the most interesting having over 80% lauric acid (Graham et al. 1981, Graham and Kleiman 1985). As most species are small herbaceous plants and many are adapted to the colder regions of highland Mexico, it is hoped that a mechanized crop suitable for temperate climates might be developed and reduce the dependency of lauric oil importing countries on wildly fluctuating supplies from coconut producers. Satisfactory yields have not been achieved in the USA because of shattering (Hirsinger and Knowles 1984, Hirsinger 1985). Attention has been drawn to several other problems such as seed dormancy, slow growth and the variable chromosome numbers and fatty acid composition observed in different species (Arkcoll 1988). Many wild species have not yet been studied and an effort is being made to collect this germplasm in order to locate desirable characteristics. Research is also in progress to obtain indehiscence through mutations and also to splice the appropriate Cuphea genes into a conventional crop such as rape (Thompson 1984, Tokay 1985). Sudden success in either of these efforts could lead rapidly to the development of an important new crop to supply the enormous market for lauric oils. It would also help to expand markets for medium chain (mixtures of C8 and C10) triglycerides that have considerable commercial potential, especially as lubricants and nutritionally desirable and medically useful oils (Bach and Babayan 1982). There is considerable interest in the pharmacological properties of extracts from the whole plant of some species used as a cure-all in local folk medicine in Brazil. There is now scientific confirmation of several potentially useful separate effects including depression of the central nervous system and the ability to reduce blood pressure in experimental animals (Ericeira et al. 1984). (source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/proceedings1990/v1-367.html on 3/29/2013)

Several Cuphea species are popular ornamental plants or honey plants. C. ignea 'David Verity' and C. micropetalia are popular plants to attract hummingbirds.
Some species of Cuphea are used to produce cuphea oil, of interest as sources of medium-chain triglycerides. For most purposes, cuphea oil is identical to coconut oil and palm oil; these are derived from strictly tropical plants however and – particularly in the latter case – the expanding production of which has caused a considerable amount of habitat destruction. Cuphea may thus produce a valuable source of income for farmers in temperate regions, and by supplementing coconut and palm oil to satisfy the growing demand (e.g. for biodiesel production) at the same time decreasing the need for wholesale logging in tropical countries. Early attempts at commercial production have focused on an interspecific hybrid population derived from C. lanceolata and Clammy Cuphea (C. viscosissima).

Cuphea has also been shown to improve agricultural crops in North America when used in crop rotation. Crop rotation is commonly practiced among farmers to improve soil quality, control host-specific pests, and decrease the use of fertilizers and pesticides. When cuphea was introduced into the crop rotation of corn and wheat, scientists from the Agricultural Research Service of the USDA found that the addition of cuphea had positive effects on the following harvest, including a higher yield of crop and crops that are higher in protein.[1] Such research reveals how cuphea can be used in agriculture to increase the profitability of crops like wheat and corn.
The seed oils of some species are very rich in one particular fatty acid. C. painteri oil, for example, is about three-quarters caprylic acid; C. carthagenensis oil consists of about 80% lauric acid. C. koehneana oil may be the richest natural source of a single fatty acid, with 95% of its content consisting of capric acid.

Selected species

Cuphea procumbens fruits
* Cuphea aspera Chapman
* Cuphea carthagenensis (Jacq.) J.F.MacBr.
* Cuphea cyanea DC.
* Cuphea decandra W.T.Aiton
* Cuphea epilobiifolia
* Cuphea hookeriana Walp.
* Cuphea hyssopifolia Kunth – false heather, Mexican heather
* Cuphea ignea A.DC.
* Cuphea ingrata Cham. et Schltdl.
* Cuphea jorullensis Kunth
* Cuphea koehneana Rose
* Cuphea laminuligera Koehne
* Cuphea lanceolata W.T.Aiton
* Cuphea linarioides Cham. et Schltdl.
* Cuphea llavea Lex. – bat-faced cuphea [4]
* Cuphea lutea Rose
* Cuphea lutescens Hoehne
* Cuphea melvilla Lindl.
* Cuphea mesostemon Koehne
* Cuphea micropetala Kunth
* Cuphea nudicostata
* Cuphea painteri Rose
* Cuphea procumbens Ortega
* Cuphea salvadorensis Standl.
* Cuphea speciosa Mart.
* Cuphea strigulosa
* Cuphea viscosissima Jacq. – clammy cuphea, blue waxweed, tarweed
* Cuphea wrightii A.Gray[5]

References

Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cuphea


Wikispecies has information related to: Cuphea
1. ^ "Cuphea P. Browne". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 1994-09-07. Retrieved 2010-07-09.
2. ^ Sunset Western Garden Book, 1995:606–607
3. ^ Quattrocchi, Umberto (2000). CRC World Dictionary of Plant Names. I: A-C. CRC Press. p. 664. ISBN 978-0-8493-2675-2.
4. ^ Rainy Side Gardeners: Cuphea llavea 'Tiny Mice'
5. ^ "Species Records of Cuphea". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2010-07-09.
Categories:
* Cuphea
* Lythraceae (source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuphea on //2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

View plant and fruit at, http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Cuphea+spp.+&qpvt=Cuphea+spp.+&FORM=IGRE

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Your Friend in Christ Iris89

Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!





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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Jan 15, 2014 10:52 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Murraya koenigii, a tree which produces an aromatic leaf often used in Indian cuisine. . The curry tree is a tropical to sub-tropical tree in the family Rutaceae, which is native to India.
Its leaves are used in many dishes in India and neighbouring countries. Often used in curries, the leaves generally go by the name "curry leaves", though they are also translated as "sweet neem leaves" in most Indian languages (as opposed to ordinary neem leaves which are bitter).

It is a small tree, growing 4–6 m (13-20 feet) tall, with a trunk up to 40 cm diameter. The leaves are pinnate, with 11-21 leaflets, each leaflet 2–4 cm long and 1–2 cm broad. They are highly aromatic. The flowers are small, white, and fragrant. [SOURCE - RETRIEVED FROM http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry_Tree ON 1/05/2013]

CAUTION – NEVER EAT THE SEEDS OF THE SMALL FRUIT ON THIS TREE AS THEY ARE QUITE POISONESS.
The leaves are highly valued as seasoning in southern and west-coast Indian cooking, and Sri Lankan cooking, especially in curries, usually fried along with the chopped onion in the first stage of the preparation. They are also used to make thoran, vada, rasam and kadhi. In their fresh form, they have a short shelf life, and they don't keep well in the refrigerator. They are also available dried, though the aroma is largely inferior.
Although most commonly used in curries, leaves from the curry tree can be used in many other dishes to add flavor. In Cambodia, Khmer toast the leaves in open flame or roasted it to a crunch and crushed it into a soured soup dish called Maju Krueng.

Seeds must be ripe and fresh to plant; dried or shriveled fruits are not viable. One can plant the whole fruit, but it's best to remove the pulp before planting in potting mix that is kept moist but not wet.
Stem cuttings can be also used for propagation. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curry_Tree on 1/05/2013]
In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Curry leaves are the young leaves of the Curry Tree/Plant, a member of the Rutaceae family that grows wild and in gardens all over India. Fresh curry leaves are oval in shape and best used at about 1 inch in length. They have a pungent and bitter smell much like the leaves of a citrus tree. Leaves are most powerful when fresh, but can be dried and used to less effect.

Curry leaves are commonly used as seasoning in Indian and Sri Lankan cooking, much like bay leaves and provide a flavouring for curries, vegetable, fish and meat dishes, soups (rasams), pickles, butter milk preparations, chutneys, scrambled eggs and curry powder blends. For some recipes, the leaves are oven-dried or toasted immediately before use. Another common technique is short frying in butter or oil. (Taken from Wikipedia)

The curry leaf is also said to have medicinal properties, the juice of curry leaves mixed with water is used by some to combat high blood pressure (hypertension). For this treatment; make a juice of 25-30 curry leaves with 1 cup of water, strain and drink first thing in the morning. Limejuice can be added for taste. [source - retrieved from http://247curry.com/Curry_Leaf.htm on 1/02/2013]

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Jan 18, 2014 4:05 pm


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the custard-apple, also called bullock's heart or bull's heart, is the fruit of the tree Annona reticulata. This species is a small deciduous or semievergreen tree sometimes reaching 10 m (33 ft) tall; it is a native of the tropical New World that prefers low elevations, and a warm, humid climate. It is cultivated in many tropical countries, and also occurs as feral populations in many parts of the world, including Southeast Asia, Taiwan, India, Pakistan, Australia, and Africa.

The fruits are variable in shape, oblong, or irregular. The size ranges from 7–12 cm (2.8–4.7 in). When ripe, the fruit is brown or yellowish, with red highlights and a varying degree of reticulation, depending on variety. The flavor is sweet and pleasant, akin to the taste of 'traditional' custard. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard-apple on 1/05/2013]

Both in tree and in fruit, the custard apple, Annona reticulata L., is generally rated as the mediocre or "ugly duckling" species among the prominent members of this genus. Its descriptive English name has been widely misapplied to other species and to the hybrid ATEMOYA, and it is sometimes erroneously termed "sugar apple", "sweetsop" and, by Spanish-speaking people, "anon" or "rinon", in India, "ramphal", all properly applied only to Annona squamosa. It has, itself, acquired relatively few appropriate regional names. Most commonly employed as an alternate name in English-speaking areas is bullock's-heart or bull's-heart; in French, coeur de boeuf; Portuguese, coracao de boi; in Spanish, often merely corazon—all alluding to its form and external blush. The skin color is reflected in the Bolivian name, chirimoya roia, the Salvadoran anona rosada, and the Guatemalan anona roja or anona colorada. In the latter country it is also known as anona de seso. Araticum ape or araticum do mato are additional names in Brazil. Some people refer to it as Jamaica apple, or as netted custard apple, which is translated as anona de redecilla in Honduras and Nicaragua. Cachiman, cachiman coeur de boeuf and corossol sauvage may be heard in the French-influenced West Indies.

The custard apple tree is not especially attractive. It is erect, with a rounded or spreading crown and trunk 10 to 14 in (25-35 cm) thick. Height ranges from 15 to 35 ft (4.5-10 m). The ill-smelling leaves are deciduous, alternate, oblong or narrow-lanceolate, 4 to 8 in (10-20 cm) long, 3/4 to 2 in (2 5 cm) wide, with conspicuous veins. Flowers, in drooping clusters, are fragrant, slender, with 3 outer fleshy, narrow petals 3/4 to 1 1/4 in (2 3 cm) long; light-green externally and pale-yellow with a dark-red or purple spot on the inside at the base. The flowers never fully open.

The compound fruit, 3 l/4 to 6 1/2 in (8-16 cm) in diameter, may be symmetrically heart-shaped, lopsided, or irregular; or nearly round, or oblate, with a deep or shallow depression at the base. The skin, thin but tough, may be yellow or brownish when ripe, with a pink, reddish or brownish-red blush, and faintly, moderately, or distinctly reticulated. There is a thick, cream-white layer of custardlike, somewhat granular, flesh beneath the skin surrounding the concolorous moderately juicy segments, in many of which there is a single, hard, dark-brown or black, glossy seed, oblong, smooth, less than 1/2 in (1.25 cm) long. Actual seed counts have been 55, 60 and 76. A pointed, fibrous, central core, attached to the thick stem, extends more than halfway through the fruit. The flavor is sweet and agreeable though without the distinct character of the cherimoya, sugar apple, or atemoya. [source - retrieved from http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/custard_apple.html on 1/04/2013]

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org]
.
Cultivars
'Tikal'
is of excellent quality and medium yield; its flesh is bright-red, except in the white areas surrounding the seeds.
'Canul'
has a medium fruit with a waxy, shiny dark-red surface and purplish red flesh; it is very aromatic and deliciously sweet with few concretions of hard cells.
'Sarteneja'
has a medium fruit with a waxy, shiny red surface and pink flesh with a magnificent taste and texture, although the fruit is not as attractive in appearance as that of the previous two cultivars. The tree is sturdier.
'San Pablo'
has a long, large fruit with an opaque, light-red surface. The flesh is dark-pink with a good aroma and taste. It is a vigorous, productive cultivar.
'Benque'
has a big, conical fruit with a dark-red surface and very tasty dark-pink flesh.
'Caledonia'
has a small fruit with a dark surface: it is very attractive to cochineal insects (Philophaedra spp.), which are not very common in other varieties. The flesh is pink and has an excellent taste.
'Chonox'
has a medium fruit with a red skin and juicy, very tasty pink flesh; it is very productive, so often has low-quality fruit. It produces abundant flowers in groups of up to 16 [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Custard-apple on 1/05/2013]

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Tue Jan 21, 2014 2:44 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Darwin's Barberry Berberis darwinii

Small blue/purple edible berry growing on an ornamental bush. Berberis darwinii is an evergreen Shrub growing to 9 feet by 11 feet at a medium rate. It is hardy to zone 7 and is not frost tender. The flowers are hermaphrodite (have both male and female organs) and are pollinated by insects, self.The plant is self-fertile. It is noted for attracting wildlife.

Suitable for: light (sandy), medium (loamy) and heavy (clay) soils and can grow in heavy clay and nutritionally poor soils. Suitable pH: acid, neutral and basic (alkaline) soils and can grow in very acid soils.

It can grow in semi-shade (light woodland) or no shade. It prefers moist soil. The plant can tolerate maritime exposure. (source - retrieved from http://www.seedman.com/fruit.htm on 4/2/2013)

Berberis darwinii is a species of barberry in the family Berberidaceae,[1] native to southern Chile and Argentina. Common names include 'Darwin's Barberry' and (Argentinean-Chilean Spanish) 'Michay'.

It is an evergreen thorny shrub growing to 3–4 m tall, with dense branches from ground level. The leaves are small oval, 12–25 mm long and 5–12 mm broad, with a spiny margin; they are borne in clusters of 2–5 together, subtended by a three-branched spine 2–4 mm long. The flowers are orange, 4–5 mm long, produced in dense racemes 2–7 cm long in spring. The fruit is a small purple-black berry 4–7 mm diameter, ripening in summer.

B. darwinii was discovered (in Western science) in South America in 1835 by Charles Darwin during the voyage of the 'Beagle'; however, the berries of this species were consumed by prehistoric native peoples[2] in the Patagonian region over millennia. The species was one of many named in honour of Darwin.[3]
It is a popular garden and hedging shrub in the British Isles. The Royal Horticultural Society has given the species its Award of Garden Merit.[4] The edible fruit is very acidic.

B. darwinii is regarded as an invasive plant pest in New Zealand[5] that escaped from gardens into indigenous plant communities via its bird-dispersed seeds.[6] It is considered a serious threat to indigenous ecosystems throughout New Zealand[7] and is listed on the National Pest Plant Accord. In Australia, the species is naturalised in the states of South Australia, Victoria, New South Wales and Tasmania.[8]


References
1. ^ Chilebosque: Berberis darwinii [1] Retrieved Aug. 2008
2. ^ C.Michael Hogan (2008) Cueva del Milodon, The Megalithic Portal, ed. A. Burnham [2]
3. ^ New York Academy of Sciences, Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, Published by The Academy, 1909
4. ^ http://apps.rhs.org.uk/plantselector/plant?plantid=233
5. ^ Darwin's barberry, Containment pest plants, Greater Wellington Regional Council website, retrieved 12 January 2009.
6. ^ Darwin’s barberry, DOC's weed work, Department of Conservation website, retrieved 4 January 2011.
7. ^ Seedling Recruitment of the Invasive Species Berberis Darwinii (Darwin's Barberry): What Contributes to Invasion Success?, McAlpine, Katherine (Kate) Grace, 2005, Victoria University of Wellington doctoral thesis, retrieved 12 January 2009.
8. ^ "Berberis darwinii". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 20 March 2012. (source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Berberis_darwinii on 4/2/2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

View plant and fruit at, https://www.google.com/search?q=Darwin%27s+Barberry+Berberis+darwinii&hl=en&client=firefox&hs=etY&rls=com.yahoo:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=copbUZr7AeH20gGQg4HwDQ&ved=0CDsQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=854


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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!





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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Jan 25, 2014 8:30 pm


Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the The date palm (Phoenix dactylifera) is a palm in the genus Phoenix, cultivated for its edible sweet fruit. Although its place of origin is unknown because of long cultivation, it probably originated from lands around Iraq. It grows 70–75 feet in height, growing singly or forming a clump with several stems from a single root system. The leaves are 4–6 m long, with spines on the petiole, and pinnate, with about 150 leaflets; the leaflets are 30 cm long and 2 cm wide. The full span of the crown ranges from 6 to 10 m. Dates contain 20–70 calories each, depending on size and species.

The fruit is known as a date. The fruit's English name (through Old French), as well as the Latin species name dactylifera, both come from the Greek word for "finger," dáktulos, because of the fruit's elongated shape. Dates are oval-cylindrical, 3–7 cm long, and 2–3 cm diameter, and when ripe, range from bright red to bright yellow in colour, depending on variety. Dates contain a single stone about 2–2.5 cm long and 6–8 mm thick. Three main cultivar groups of date exist: soft (e.g. 'Barhee', 'Halawy', 'Khadrawy', 'Medjool'), semi-dry (e.g. 'Dayri', 'Deglet Noor', 'Zahdi'), and dry (e.g. 'Thoory'). The type of fruit depends on the glucose, fructose and sucrose content.

The date palm is dioecious, having separate male and female plants. They can be easily grown from seed, but only 50% of seedlings will be female and hence fruit bearing, and dates from seedling plants are often smaller and of poorer quality. Most commercial plantations thus use cuttings of heavily cropping cultivars. Plants grown from cuttings will fruit 2–3 years earlier than seedling plants.
Dates are naturally wind pollinated but in both traditional oasis horticulture and in the modern commercial orchards they are entirely pollinated manually. Natural pollination occurs with about an equal number of male and female plants. However, with assistance, one male can pollinate up to 100 females. Since the males are of value only as pollinators, this allows the growers to use their resources for many more fruit producing female plants. Some growers do not even maintain any male plants as male flowers become available at local markets at pollination time. Manual pollination is done by skilled labourers on ladders. In some areas such as Iraq the pollinator climbs the tree using a special climbing tool that wraps around the tree trunk and the climber's back to keep him attached to the trunk while climbing. Less often the pollen may be blown onto the female flowers by a wind machine.

Fresh dates, clockwise from top right: crunchy, crunchy opened, soft out of skin, soft.

Parthenocarpic cultivars are available but the seedless fruit is smaller and of lower quality.[citation needed]
Dates ripen in four stages, which are known throughout the world by their Arabic names kimri (unripe), khlal (full-size, crunchy), rutab (ripe, soft), tamar (ripe, sun-dried).

Dates are an important traditional crop in Iraq, Arabia, and north Africa west to Morocco and are mentioned more than 50 times in the Bible. In Islamic culture, dates and yogurt or milk are traditionally the first foods consumed for Iftar after the sun has set during Ramadan. Dates (especially Medjool and Deglet Noor) are also cultivated in southern California, Arizona and southern Florida in the United States.
Date palms can take 4 to 8 years after planting before they will bear fruit, and produce viable yields for commercial harvest between 7 to 10 years. Mature date palms can produce 80–120 kilograms (176–264 lb) of dates per harvest season, although they do not all ripen at the same time so several harvests are required. In order to get fruit of marketable quality, the bunches of dates must be thinned and bagged or covered before ripening so that the remaining fruits grow larger and are protected from weather and pests such as birds. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_dactylifera on 1/04/2013]
In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

Instructions for starting and planting date seeds:
1.
o 1
Purchase date palm seeds or some whole dates at the local grocery store. If you buy whole dates, take off as much of the meat off the seed as you can. Then soak the seeds for 48 hours in a bowl of water. Change the water two or three times and pick the rest of meat off with a pair of tweezers. The meat on the seed will cause mold if not picked off.
o 2
Place vermiculite in a sandwich-sized plastic dish that has a lid. Mix in 2 tsp. of water and the seeds. Place the lid on the dish and put it in a warm place in your home. Some warm places may be over your stove, over a water heater or near a heater boiler.
o Sponsored Links
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o 3
Check the seeds every two or three days. If the vermiculite gets completely dry, add a few drops of water. Watch for the seeds to sprout.
o 4
Place sprouted seeds in a small flower pot full of compost, just under the surface. Water them enough to dampen soil, but don't over water. Keep warm and damp and you will see a leaf start to grow from the soil.
o 5
Transplant into a larger pot by putting a layer of stones and filling the rest of the pot with well-draining soil. Dig a hole in the center and place the entire contents of the small pot in the hole. Place the pot in a sunny place. Transplant outside when the plant is about 4 feet tall.
o 6
Decide on a place in your yard to plant the seedling tree. It will need full sun and it will grow up to 100 feet, so it will need plenty of space. Plant the tree outside when it is warm both day and night.
o 7
Plant the tree by digging a hole larger than the pot. Line the hole with compost and place all the dirt and tree from its pot into the hole. Fertilize with fertilizer made for fruit trees or manure. If using manure, don't let it touch the trunk of a very young tree.
o 8
Water when the soil feels dry. As the tree gets larger, water every week to every other week in summer, but water longer. It will only need to be watered every 20 to 30 days the rest of the year. [source - retrieved from http://www.ehow.com/how_5009733_grow-date-trees-seed.html on 1/04/2013]

Read more: How to Grow Date Trees From a Seed | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/how_5009733_grow-date-trees-seed.html#ixzz2HKXG0kTa.
How this tree and other plants absorb water from the ground. Plants have developed an effective system to absorb, translocate, store, and utilize water. Plants contain a vast network of conduits, which consists of xylem and phloem tissues. These conducting tissues start in the roots and continue up through the trunks of trees, into the branches and then into every leaf. Phloem tissue is made of living elongated cells that are connected to one another and responsible for translocating nutrients and sugars (carbohydrates), which are produced by leaves for energy and growth. The xylem is also composed of elongated cells but once the cells are formed, they die. The walls of the xylem cells still remain intact and serve as an excellent peipline to transport water from the roots to the leaves.

The main driving force of water uptake and transport into a plant is transpiration of water from leaves through specialized openings called stomata. Heat from the sun causes the water to evaporate, setting this ‘water chain’ in motion. The evaporation creates a negative water vapor pressure. Water is pulled into the leaf to replace the water that has transpired from the leaf. This pulling of water, or tension, occurs in the xylem of the leaf. Since the xylem is a continuous water column that extends from the leaf to the roots, this negative water pressure extends into the roots and results in water uptake from the soil. [adapted from: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=follow-up-how-do-trees-ca ]

Clearly this clever water transport system shows a superior intelligence of the Creator (YHWH).


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Tue Jan 28, 2014 6:53 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Date Plum Diospyros lotus

A type of persimmon tree, produces a small fruit with a taste similar to both dates and plums. Known by the ancient Greeks as the fruit of the gods, the date plum is renowned for its sweet taste.

It is a decidious tree that is native to Middle East and South Asia, especially from China and Japan. This tree can reach up to 90 ft (30 m) tall in warm areas, but will generally be smaller. (Up to about 30 ft -10 m- tall) it bears edible small fruits in autumn.

The leaves of the date plum are decidious, and are about up to 4-5 in (10 - 12.5 cm) long. Flowers - Flowers are small and yellow-green, and are dioecious. At least both a male and female plant will be required to get viable seeds. A pack of 10 seeds will usually produce both male and female plants, can be pollinated by other persimmons.

The date plum is a close relative to the persimon. However, the date plum is a smaller fruit, as it is about 0.75 in (2 cm) wide. It is a globose yellow fruit that turns purple-brown when fully ripe. Like the persimon, the date plum looses its astringency when fully ripe. The flesh is then very soft and rich in flavour.

This tree is frost hardy down to -15°F (-25°C) and less. It can easily be grown in USDA zones 5 and warmer. The date plum needs a fairly well-drained and deep ground. (source - retrieved from http://www.seedman.com/fruit.htm on 4/3/2013)

Distribution and ecology
The species area extends from East Asia to the west of the Mediterranean, down to Spain. The Date-plum is native to southwest Asia and southeast Europe. It was known to the ancient Greeks as "the fruit of the gods" i.e. Dios pyros (lit. "the wheat of Zeus"), hence the scientific name of the genus. Its English name probably derives from Persian Khormaloo,literally "Date-Plum", referring to the taste of this fruit which is reminiscent of both plums and dates. This species is one candidate for the "lotus tree" mentioned in The Odyssey: it was so delicious that those who ate it forgot about returning home and wanted to stay and eat lotus with the lotus-eaters.[1]

The tree grows in the lower and middle mountain zones in the Caucasus. They usually grow up to 600 m above sea level. In Central Asia, it rises higher—up to 2000 m. They rarely grow in stands but often grows with the frame, ash, maple and other deciduous species. It is not demanding on the soil and can grow on rocky slopes but requires a well lit environment.

It is cultivated at the limits of its range, as well as in the U.S. and North Africa.

Biological description
This is a tree height of 15–30 m with sloughing of aging bark.
The leaves are shiny, leathery, oval shape with pointed ends, 5–15 cm long and 3–6 cm in width.

The flowers are small, greenish, appearing in June to July.
Fruits are berries with juicy flesh, yellow when ripe, 1–2 cm in diameter. Seeds with thin skin and a very hard endosperm.
*
The fruit of date-plum.
*
The leaves of date-plum.
*
The trunk of date-plum.

Usage
Caucasian persimmon fruits are edible and contain lots of sugars, malic acid, and vitamins. They are used as fresh fruits or after frost, but usually dried. Drying and frost destroy their tartness.

References
1. ^ Homer. "The Odyssey". Project Gutenberg. p. 76. Retrieved 2007-10-13. (source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Date-plum on 4/3/2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

View plant and fruit at, https://www.google.com/search?q=Date+Plum+Diospyros+lotus&hl=en&client=firefox&hs=c7j&rls=com.yahoo:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=ADNcUcmlO8Wn4AOQ_YFY&ved=0CEMQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=854


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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:29 pm


The strange blue sausage fruits bears 3-5", slender fruits that look much like its name suggests. Fruits are edible, with a somewhat sweet flavor, through are not cultivated. Popular as an ornamental or conversation piece. Deciduous, grows to 10-15 feet. Hardy to 0F and a bit lower  (source - retrieved from   http://www.tradewindsfruitstore.com/servlet/the-2131/Decaisnea-fargesii--dsh--Blue/Detail  on  4/1/2013)


In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to  www.jw.org">.

View this plant and fruit at,  https://www.google.com/search?q=Decaisnea+Fargesii&hl=en&client=firefox&hs=YhB&rls=com.yahoo:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=KS5aUZr6FfW14AODsYDgDQ&ved=0CDcQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=854


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Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!




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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Feb 01, 2014 9:32 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Decaisnea Lindl. is a synonym of Tropidia, an orchid genus.

Classification
Kingdom:
Plantae
Division:
Magnoliophyta
Class:
Magnoliopsida
Order:
Ranunculales
Family:
Lardizabalaceae
Genus:
Decaisnea
Hook.f. & Thomson
Species
Decaisnea fargesii
Decaisnea insignis
Decaisnea also known as dead man's fingers is a genus of flowering plant in the family Lardizabalaceae, native to eastern Asia, from China west to Nepal and south to Myanmar.

The genus comprises one or two species, depending on taxonomic opinion. Decaisnea insignis (Griffith) Hook.f. & Thomson was described from Nepal, and is sometimes restricted to the plants occurring in the Himalaya, with Chinese plants distinguished as Decaisnea fargesii Franchet. The only cited distinction (e.g. Bean 1973, Rushforth 1999) between the plants from the two regions is the fruit colour, yellow-green in D. insignis and bluish in D. fargesii. This is of little significance and the two are now combined under the older name D. insignis by some authors (e.g. Flora of China).

They are deciduous shrubs or small trees growing to 5-8 m tall with trunks up to 20 cm diameter. The leaves are pinnate, 60-90 cm long, with 13-25 leaflets, each leaflet 7-15 cm long and 5-10 cm broad. The flowers are produced in drooping panicles 25-50 cm long, each flower greenish-yellow, 3-6 cm diameter, with six sepals and no petals. The fruit is a soft greenish-yellow to bluish pod-like follicle 7-10 cm long and 2-3 cm diameter, filled with an edible transparent glutinous jelly-like pulp containing numerous flat black seeds 1 cm diameter.
Cultivation and uses


Decaisnea fargesii fruit
Decaisnea is grown as an ornamental plant for its bold foliage and decorative fruit, bright blue in many cultivated plants, hence the common name dead man's fingers. Most plants in cultivation derive from Chinese seed and are commonly grown under the name D. fargesii.

Decaisnea belongs to the chocolate vine family. Its range covers the Himalayas to western China. The plants are deciduous shrubs and noted for their showy ornamental edible fruit. It is not very hard to grow in cooler temperate climates, in a fertile, well-drained soil. They are quite frost hardy, able to tolerate temperatures down to at least -15°C (5°F). USDA Zones 6-10 (source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decaisnea on 4/1/2013)

Noteworthy Characteristics
Decaisnea fargesii is an upright, multi-stemmed, deciduous shrub that is native to woodlands, thickets, mountain slopes and ravines in western China, Bhutan, NE India, Myanmar, Nepal and Sikkim. This shrub typically grows to 20' tall and as wide. It is ornamentally grown in some areas for its long odd-pinnate leaves, its monoecious flowers in drooping racemes and its exceptional metallic blue bean-like fruit pods. Each leaf (to 36" long) has 13-25 ovate to elliptic leaflets that are dark green above and glaucous green beneath. Drooping racemes (to 18" long) of apetalous, bell-shaped, green to yellow-green flowers bloom in summer. Although individual flowers are not particularly showy, the large racemes in bloom are interesting and attractive. Flowers give way to the piece de resistance: cylindrical, bean-like seed pods (to 4" long) that ripen to blue in fall. It is these fruits (actually fleshy follicles) that distinguish this plant. Common names of deadman's fingers, blue sausage fruit, blue cucumber shrub and blue bean tree all convey the general message that the fruits are quite interesting and unique. Fruits will split open at maturity to reveal a large mass of seeds imbedded in edible pulp. Lepchas (aboriginal inhabitants of Sikkim) relish this fruit, but it is not eaten much outside its native geographic range. This species was discovered by Pere Paul Guillaume Farges (1844-1912) who lived in China and collected and recorded plants there from 1867 until his death. Decaisnea was originally considered to have only two species, D. insignis and D. fargesii, with the only difference between the two being that the former had yellow green fruit and the latter had blue fruit. Today, some experts continue to list two different species (see Royal Horticultural Society), but others have combined both species into D. insignis (see Flora of China). (source - retrieved from http://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/gardens-gardening/your-garden/plant-finder/plant-details/kc/d289/decaisnea-fargesii.aspx on 4/1/2013)

The strange blue sausage fruits bears 3-5", slender fruits that look much like its name suggests. Fruits are edible, with a somewhat sweet flavor, through are not cultivated. Popular as an ornamental or conversation piece. Deciduous, grows to 10-15 feet. Hardy to 0F and a bit lower (source - retrieved from http://www.tradewindsfruitstore.com/servlet/the-2131/Decaisnea-fargesii--dsh--Blue/Detail on 4/1/2013)


In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

View this plant and fruit at, https://www.google.com/search?q=Decaisnea+Fargesii&hl=en&client=firefox&hs=YhB&rls=com.yahoo:en-US:official&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=KS5aUZr6FfW14AODsYDgDQ&ved=0CDcQsAQ&biw=1280&bih=854


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Your Friend in Christ Iris89

Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth."Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to www.jw.org!





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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Wed Feb 05, 2014 11:54 am

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Dialium schlechteri, An African fruit tree bearing 1", velvet skinned, red-brown fruits with a dry, orange pulp. The pulp is said to taste like sherbet and is popular amongst locals in the tree's native range. Native to southern parts of Africa

Distribution:
Mozambique

Range:
northern KwaZulu-Natal;
Habitat:
In lowland dry woodland and dry forest on sand or alluvial soils associated with <i>Acacia, Albizia, Afzelia, Terminalia, Balanites, Euphorbia</i>; below 200 m.

Description:
Tree 5–10 m high; bark smooth, ± grey. Young branches minutely puberulous. Leaves: petiole and rachis together (3)5–9(14) cm long, puberulous; leaflets (7)9–11(13), alternate or the lower opposite, or occasionally all opposite except the terminal one, 1–3.5(4.3) × 0.7–2 cm, the lower ones broadly ovate and rounded at the base, the upper ones elliptic and cuneate at the base, asymmetric at the base, broadly rounded or rarely slightly acuminate at the apex, glabrous or with a few hairs on the midrib beneath; petiolule 1–2 mm long, puberulous. Flowers 6–8 mm across, in panicles up to 25 × 20 cm; inflorescence axes puberulous to appressed pubescent; pedicels 1–3 mm. Buds and sepals up to 3–3.5 mm long, densely covered in appressed brown hairs outside; sepals white or cream or yellowish-green inside. Petals 0, or rarely two sepal-like structures present in addition to the five sepals in some flowers. Stamens 6–10; anthers 1–1.5 mm long; filaments 1.5–2.5 mm long. Ovary c.1 mm long, brown tomentose; style 2–3 mm, glabrous or with a few hairs towards the base. Fruits 1.2–2 × 1–1.5 cm, slightly elongate, smoothly rounded at apex with style base not showing, densely dark brown-puberulous to -tomentellous. Seeds 1 or 2, brown, shiny, 8–9 × 3.5–5 mm and ± lenticular when only one developing, c.8 × 5 × 4 mm and elongate with ± triangular cross-section when two per fruit.

Notes:
Conservation notes: Probably Lower Risk, Least Concern. This species has hitherto been described as having 10 stamens, but dissection of young flowers of a number of collections now reveals that there may be any number from 6 to 10, often (but not always) apparently a constant number in any one plant. One collection, Barbosa & Lemos 7962, has sometimes had 7 perianth segments, poorly differentiated between sepals and petals. Some collections from near Inhambane (Gomes e Sousa 1650 and 1675) have rather large coriaceous leaflets with a slightly acuminate apex, rather approaching those of D. holtzii, but in all other respects they agree well with D. schlechteri. (source - retrieved from http://apps.kew.org/efloras/namedetail.do?flora=fz&taxon=10884&nameid=27766 on //2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

The only pictures available are in a foreign language page on this tree at, http://www.falconlabs.com.ua/catalog.php?sho=1&elsh=2549&catid=3&scat=7

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To enjoy an online Bible study called “Follow the Christ” go to, http://religious-truths.forums.com/defau...#post-1421

Your Friend in Christ Iris89

Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth. "Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to http://www.jw.org!





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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Feb 08, 2014 1:55 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Monkey Plum, Diospyros lycioides, occurs in Central Africa, southern Tanzania, throughout southern Africa, including South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland, but excluding the winter-rainfall area. It is occasionally cultivated in South Africa and elsewhere in the tropics. In Australia it also naturalized and categorized as a weed.

Vernacular names

Bluebush, bluebush star-apple, red star-apple, monkey plum, African persimmon (En). Plaqueminier élégant (Fr).

Uses

Pieces of root of Diospyros lycioides are widely and commonly used as toothbrush, and pieces of the stem are used similarly in some areas. The small-sized wood is mainly suitable for small items of furniture and carvings such as trinket boxes, spoons and handles for tools and implements. Occasionally the wood is used in hut construction, especially where smaller branches are needed. It is also used for fencing and as fuel. The leaves are important browse for both domestic and wild animals, although it is said to taint the milk of cows. In southern Africa the fruit and seed are used as food and are also used to make beer. Fruits are also fermented to distil alcohol. The roasted ground seeds were once used as a coffee substitute. A yellowish brown dye is obtained from the roots while the bark is used for tanning skins. In Botswana the dye is used to colour palm leaves for basketry. The plant is a bee forage. In South Africa and some parts of Europe, Diospyros lycioides is planted in gardens and used in landscaping.

The roots are used medicinally by local people. The root is chewed for the treatment of colds and coughs. The powdered root or a root extract is used against eye ailments. The roasted and powdered root mixed with mutton fat makes a thorn plaster and is used to ease body pain. The powdered root bark is used as an abortifacient; it is also rubbed into scarifications to treat patients with pneumonia or snake-bites. Root decoctions are held in the mouth to allay toothache or gargled against a sore throat, and they are drunk against female infertility, blood in the stool, abdominal pain, body pain, cardiac pain, and epilepsy. Root decoctions are taken against dysmenorrhoea and form part of a medicine given to vomiting babies. The root decoction and the raw fruit are considered to be effective against tuberculosis. In South Africa decoctions of the root mixed with those of Cassia petersiana (Bolle) Lock and Euclea natalensis A.DC. are eaten with sheep or goat meat to treat epilepsy and asthma.
The Venda people use Diospyros lycioides, mixed with Gardenia sp., to appease the spirit of a young man who has died before marriage. In times of war they use parts of this tree mixed with hedgehog prickles and duiker blood to provide protection against enemies. In Zimbabwe and Malawi pieces of root are buried in the corners of the house as protection against witchcraft.

Production and international trade

The fruits are traded locally in southern Africa. In Australia Diospyros lycioides is a quarantined weed which requires assessment before entry into the country. There are no restrictions on its importation in the United States.

Properties
Chewing the root gives the teeth a yellow colour. In a health survey in Namibia users of Diospyros lycioides toothbrushes were found to have less caries than non-users. Early analyses of extracts of the leaves and young twigs yielded lupeol and ursolic acid. Later, methanol extracts of the twigs were found to inhibit growth of several common oral pathogens, including Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus sanguinis, Prevotella intermedia and Porphyromonas gingivalis which supports their use as chewing sticks. The bactericidal effect has been attributed to several naphthalene glycosides (named diospyrosides), bi-naphthalenone glycosides, and the naphtoquinones juglone and 7-methyljuglone. Methylnaphthazarin, mamegakinone and 8’-hydroxyisodiospyrin have been identified in a trichlormethanol extract of the powdered root bark.

The heartwood of Diospyros lycioides is pink-brown and distinct from the paler sapwood. The wood is moderately durable. It is resistant to impregnation and tends to warp if not properly stacked and dried slowly. It saws cleanly and holds nails well. It planes to a fairly smooth finish. It takes paint and varnish well and glues firmly. The wood sands and polishes well. Mechanical strength and shrinkage values not known. Weight at 12% moisture content is about 750 kg/m³. The commercial availability of timber is restricted due to small size.

The fruit pulp contains per 100 g: water 78.0 g, energy 296 kJ (71 kcal), protein 0.9 g, fat 0.1 g, carbohydrate 16.5 g, crude fibre 3.5 g, Ca 66.8 mg, Mg 39.7 mg, P 13.7 mg, Fe 1.0 mg, Zn 0.3 mg, thiamin 0.11 mg, riboflavin 0.09 mg, niacin 0.17 mg, ascorbic acid 45.2 mg (Wehmeijer, A.S., 1986). The fruit is not very popular; it may be slightly poisonous for humans.

In South Africa the nutritional value of the browse was analyzed. Leaves contain 12–14 g crude protein per 100 g dry matter, twigs 7.6 g when 2 mm in diameter, 4.6 g at 10 mm diameter and further declining with thickness. Another analysis indicated that the leaves contain per 100 g dry matter 12.5 g crude protein and 54,4 g neutral detergent fibre (NDF), and the twigs 5.7 g crude protein and 64,2 g NDF. Poisoning has been recorded in sheep after they had eaten the leaves and fruits. Alkaloids have been detected in the leaf. Extracts of stem and leaves have shown dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effects by suppressing cyclooxyenase enzymes.

The tough roots rapidly blunt ploughs and other tools.

Description

Dioecious shrub or small tree up to 7 m tall, sometimes much smaller; bole sometimes spinescent towards the base; bark grey, more or less smooth. Leaves clustered at the ends of branches, simple and entire; petiole 3–15 mm long; blade obovate to oblanceolate, 1.5–8 cm × 0.5–3 cm, base cuneate, apex broadly tapering to rounded to acute, margin entire and tightly rolled under, papery to leathery, drying dull green or grey-green above, paler beneath, lower surface sparsely to densely silky hairy when young, hairs sometimes persistent, especially on the veins, midrib and lateral veins not prominently raised, secondary veins in 5–6 pairs. Flowers solitary in axils of leaves or reduced leaves towards base of current year’s growth, 8–15 mm in diameter, pendulous, creamy white, fragrant; pedicel slender, up to 3 cm long; calyx up to 8 mm long, deeply cleft into 5 lobes, densely silky hairy, lobes narrowly deltate or lanceolate-acuminate; corolla up to 1 cm. long, bell-shaped, widely open at the throat, densely strigulose outside, lobed to just below the middle, lobes 5, ovate-oblong, obtuse; male flower with 10 stamens 3–4.5 mm long, with glabrous filaments and narrowly lanceolate, apiculate, densely setose anthers, pistillode similar to functional pistil but with reduced styles and lacking stigmas; female flower with 10 densely setose staminodes 1–2 mm long, ovary subglobose, 2.5 mm × 2.5 mm, ridged, tomentellous, 6, 8 or 10-celled, styles (3–)5, common part puberulous, style-branches glabrous, ending in a shallowly bi-lobed stigma. Fruit an ovoid or globose berry up to 2 cm × 1.5 cm, apiculate, red, becoming black, downy hairy or glabrescent, persistent calyx accrescent, up to 1.5 cm long, lobes narrowly deltate and ultimately strongly reflexed, 1–6-seeded. Seeds up to 13 mm long, brown, smooth.

Other botanical information

Diospyros is a large pantropical genus of about 500 tree species. Most of them are native to the tropics, with only a few species extending into temperate regions. In tropical Africa, about 90 species occur, several of which produce valuable timber or edible fruits; in Madagascar also about 90 species occur. Phylogenetic evidence indicates that Diospyros section Royena is a distinct, monophyletic group of closely related species. It has been considered a separate genus, but most authorities retain it as a section of Diospyros.

In Diospyros lycioides 4 subspecies are recognized differing mainly in leaf form and distribution:

– subsp. lycioides (synonym: Royena lycioides (Desf.) A.DC.; vernacular name: Karoo bluebush): shrub or small tree up to 7 m tall; branchlets spreading at right angles or slightly ascending at the ends, occasionally spinescent; leaves crowded towards the tips, blade up to 4 cm × 1.5 cm, glabrous or slightly velvety, lateral veins not raised. It is mainly found in Botswana, Zimbabwe and the drier parts of Namibia and South Africa, in riparian forest and thicket at 600–1000(–2700) m altitude.

– subsp. guerkei (Kuntze) De Winter (synonym: Royena guerkei Kuntze; vernacular names: quilted bluebush, eastern bluebush, Natal bluebush): shrub or small tree up to 5 m tall; branchlets ascending, not spinescent; leaves not crowded, blade 2–5 cm × 1–2 cm, distinctly net-veined. It occurs in Botswana and north-eastern South Africa, in rocky habitats, often associated with quartzite outcrops, from sea-level up to 2150 m altitude.

– subsp. nitens (Harv. ex Hiern) De Winter (synonym: Royena nitens Harv. ex Hiern; vernacular name: silvery bluebush): small, multi-stemmed shrub up to 1.5 m tall; leaf blade small, up to 2 cm × 1 cm, densely covered with silvery hairs. It occurs in north-eastern South Africa, in dry, hot bushveld, grasslands and rocky outcrops, from sea-level up to 1550 m altitude.

– subsp. sericea (Bernh.) De Winter (synonym: Royena sericea Bernh.; vernacular names: eastern bluebush, Kalahari star apple, hairy bluebush, Natal bluebush): shrub or small tree up to 7 m tall; branchlets usually ascending, with the leaves inserted more or less evenly along their length, rarely spinescent; leaf blade up to 8 cm × 3 cm, densely hairy. It is distributed from Upper Shaba in DR Congo and Angola southwards to Namibia and eastern Cape Province in South Africa, occurring from sea-level up to 2000 m altitude in bushland and thicket, especially on riverbanks and termite mounds and in rocky locations, sometimes at edges of riparian forest or forming secondary thickets following over-grazing.


Growth and development


Early growth is fast. In Zimbabwe trees produce fruits after 4 years. In southern Africa flowering is in (August–)September–December(–April), and fruiting in (November–)January–May(–October). Old fruits remain on the tree until the next flowering season. Diospyros lycioides is in leaf year round, with some bare individuals in winter and with new leaves in September–November. The species forms thickets from the root system.

Ecology

Diospyros lycioides is one of the most widely distributed and ecologically versatile woody species in southern Africa. It occurs from sea-level up to 2700 m altitude and is most common in open vegetation, often along rivers or on termite mounds. It is an indicator of bush encroachment in rangeland in South Africa.

Propagation and planting

Diospyros lycioides seeds are orthodox and store well. Propagation is best done with seeds soaked overnight in hot water. Propagation by cuttings is very difficult. The 1000-seed weight is 90–140 g. Seedlings require exposure to full sun, but can tolerate very cold conditions. Natural dispersal of seed is mainly by mammals that eat the fruit. (source - retrieved from http://www.prota4u.org/protav8.asp?h=M4,lycioides&p=Diospyros+lycioides on 3/18/2013)


In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

To view pictures of this plant and its fruit, go to, http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=Diospyros+lycioides+Monkey+Plum&qpvt=Diospyros+lycioides+Monkey+Plum&FORM=IGRE

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Your Friend in Christ Iris89

Francis David said it long ago, "Neither the sword of popes...nor the image of death will halt the march of truth. "Francis David, 1579, written on the wall of his prison cell." Read the book, "What Does The Bible Really Teach" and the Bible today, and go to http://www.jw.org!

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Tue Feb 11, 2014 3:56 pm



In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].
.
How this tree and other plants absorb water from the ground. Plants have developed an effective system to absorb, translocate, store, and utilize water. Plants contain a vast network of conduits, which consists of xylem and phloem tissues. These conducting tissues start in the roots and continue up through the trunks of trees, into the branches and then into every leaf. Phloem tissue is made of living elongated cells that are connected to one another and responsible for translocating nutrients and sugars (carbohydrates), which are produced by leaves for energy and growth. The xylem is also composed of elongated cells but once the cells are formed, they die. The walls of the xylem cells still remain intact and serve as an excellent peipline to transport water from the roots to the leaves.

The main driving force of water uptake and transport into a plant is transpiration of water from leaves through specialized openings called stomata. Heat from the sun causes the water to evaporate, setting this ‘water chain’ in motion. The evaporation creates a negative water vapor pressure. Water is pulled into the leaf to replace the water that has transpired from the leaf. This pulling of water, or tension, occurs in the xylem of the leaf. Since the xylem is a continuous water column that extends from the leaf to the roots, this negative water pressure extends into the roots and results in water uptake from the soil. [adapted from: http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=follow-up-how-do-trees-ca ]

Clearly this clever water transport system shows a superior intelligence of the Creator (YHWH).


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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Sat Feb 15, 2014 5:36 pm

Hi Everyone:

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, specifically the Dragon Claw Millet, leusine coracanaEleusine coracana, including African finger millet and caracan millet (koracan),[1] (Common names: Bengali, Nepali: Marwa, Gujarati: Nagli, Bavto, Hindi: ragi, mandika) is an annual plant widely grown as a cereal in the arid areas of Africa and Asia. E. coracana is native to the Ethiopian Highlands.[2] It is very adaptable to higher elevations and is grown in the Himalaya up to 2,300 metres in elevation.

Cultivation
Eleusine coracana is often intercropped with legumes such as peanuts (Arachis hypogea), cowpeas (Vigna sinensis), and pigeon peas (Cajanus cajan), or other plants such as Niger seeds (Guizotia abyssinica).

Although statistics on individual millet species are confused, and are sometimes combined with sorghum, it is estimated that finger millet is grown on approximately 38,000 km2.

India is a major cultivator of finger millet with a total cultivated area of 15870 km2. The state of Karnataka is the leading producer of finger millet, known as Ragi in the region, accounting for 58% of India's Ragi production.[3]

Nutrition
Finger millet is especially valuable as it contains the amino acid methionine, which is lacking in the diets of hundreds of millions of the poor who live on starchy staples such as cassava, plantain, polished rice, or maize meal. Finger millet can be ground and cooked into cakes, puddings or porridge. The grain is made into a fermented drink (or beer) in Nepal and in many parts of Africa. The straw from finger millet is used as animal fodder. It is also used for a flavored drink in festivals.

Nutritional value of Finger Miller per 100g [4]
Protein 7.6g
Fat 1.5g
Carbohydrate 88g
Calcium 370mg
Vitamins - A: 0.48mg
Thiamine (B1): 0.33mg
Riboflavin (B2): 0.11mg
Niacin: 1.2mg
Fiber 3g

Preparation as food
In Karnataka, Ragi flour is boiled in water and the resultant preparation, called Ragi Mudde is eaten with Sambar.
In India, finger millet (locally called by various name including ragi and nachani) is mostly grown and consumed in Karnataka, Rajasthan,[5] Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Odisha, Maharashtra, Kumaon(Uttarakhand) and Goa.[6] Ragi flour is made into flatbreads, including thin, leavened dosa and thicker, unleavened roti. Ragi grain is malted and the grains are ground. This ground flour is consumed mixed with milk, boiled water or yoghurt.

In Karnataka, ragi flour is generally consumed in the form of ragi balls (ragi mudde in Kannada). It is the staple diet of majority of Southern Kannadigas, especially in the rural areas. The mudde which is prepared by cooking the Ragi flour with water to achieve a dough like consistency. Which is then rolled into 'balls' of desired size and consumed. Ghee with huLi, Saaru, sambar or chicken curry is generally served along with these balls. Mudde is broken with the fingers into small chunks, dipped in the saaru or the curry and swallowed without chewing.

In Andhra Pradesh Ragi Sankati (Telugu), which are ragi balls are eaten in the morning with a chilli, onions, sambar (lentil based stew)or meat curry and helps them sustain throughout the whole day.

In Odisha the tribal and western hilly regions ragi or Mandiaa is a staple food.The porridge and Pithas made up of ragi are more popular among village folk.

Finger millet in its commonly consumed form as a porridge
In Maharashtra, bhakri (in Marathi; also called bhakri in Northern Karnataka), a type of flat bread is prepared using finger millet (ragi) flour. Bhakri is called (ragi rotti in Kannada) in Karnataka. In Goa ragi is very popular and satva, pole (dosa), bhakri, ambil (a sour porridge) are very common preparations.

In Nepal, a thick dough made of millet flour (?h??o) is cooked and eaten with the hand. Fermented millet is used to make a beer (jãã?) and the mash is distilled to make a liquor (rak?i).

In the northwest of Vietnam, finger millet is used as a medicine for women when they give birth. A minority used finger millet flour to make alcohol (bacha alcohol is a good drink of the H'mong minority).

In the Kumaon region of northern India, it is called Maddua and is traditionally fed to women after child birth. In southern parts of India, pediatricians recommend finger-millet-based food for infants of six months and above because of its high nutritional content, especially Iron and calcium. Home made Ragi malt happens to be one of the most popular infant food even to this day. In Tamil Nadu, ragi is considered to be the holy food of Amman, otherwise knowns as "Goddess Kali". Every small or large festival of this goddess is celebrated with, women making porridge in the temples and distributing it to the poor and needy. This porridge is called Kuzl which is a staple diet in farming communities alongside raw onion.

In India, Ragi recipes are hundreds in number and even common food stuffs such as dosa, idly and laddu are made out of ragi.
Puttu: Puttu is a traditional breakfast of Kerala, usually made with Rice powder together with coconut grating and steamed in a cylindrical steamer. The preparation is also made with Ragi powder, which is supposed to be more nutritive.

In Sri Lanka, Finger millet is called Kurakkan and is made into:
Kurakkan roti: An earthy brown thick roti with coconut.

Thallapa: A thick dough made of ragi by boiling it with water and some salt until like a dough ball, it is then eaten with a very spicy meat curry and is usually swallowed in small balls than chewing.

References
1. ^ "USDA GRIN Taxonomy". http://www.ars-grin.gov/cgi-bin/npgs/html/taxon.pl?14992.
2. ^ A.C. D'Andrea, D.E. Lyons, Mitiku Haile, E.A. Butler, "Ethnoarchaeological Approaches to the Study of Prehistoric Agriculture in the Ethiopian Highlands" in Van der Veen, ed., The Exploitation of Plant Resources in Ancient Africa. Kluwer Academic: Plenum Publishers, New York, 1999.
3. ^ http://agmarknet.nic.in/ragi.pdf Govt of India - Ministry of Agrriculture Report on Ragi harvest
4. ^ "Eleusine coracana - (L.)Gaertn.". Plants For A Future. http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Eleusine+coracana. Retrieved 19 November 2012.
5. ^ Rajasthan: by Gopal K. Bhargava, Shankarlal C. Bhatt,p 319
6. ^ Ragi is one of the important crop in the Indian state of Goa (source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eleusine_coracana on 3/8/2013)

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)[for more details, go to www.jw.org].

To view pictures of this plant and its usages, go to, http://www.botanicalgarden.ubc.ca/potd/2008/06/eleusine_coracana.php

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Re: Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Post  Admin on Mon Feb 17, 2014 11:30 pm

Almighty God’s (YHWH) Great Gift to Mankind, The Rare Fruit Trees and Herbs

Here is a Commentary on Bountiful Trees and Vegetables God (YHWH) has provided for mankind, Dragon Fruit, Hylocereus species, a veining cactus of much promise. Why? It requires very little water in order to grow and San Diego farmers who are looking for a profitable plant that will reduce their water bill are strongly considering this plant.

In Genesis 1:11-13, "And God said, Let the earth put forth grass, herbs yielding seed, and fruit-trees bearing fruit after their kind, wherein is the seed thereof, upon the earth: and it was so. 12 And the earth brought forth grass, herbs yielding seed after their kind, and trees bearing fruit, wherein is the seed thereof, after their kind: and God saw that it was good. 13 And there was evening and there was morning, a third day. (American Standard Version, ASV)

Dragon fruit are fast growing, climbing cacti and require support to grow. A tree, a post, a trellis, or special box supports at 3 to 4 feet make excellent growing supports. It is only when they grow up one of these and start to have the new growth hanging down that they produce their fruit. Flowering of Dragon Fruit, Hylocereus species, is triggered by two days in a row of heavy rains with warm weather. Fruit develop quickly and usually ripen approximately 4 weeks after flowering. In general, only stems which are horizontal or hanging down will flower. The fruit can be picked anytime after coloring, though are usually best 5 to 7 days after initial color. Once the tips of the fins on the fruit turn brown, the fruit should be picked if they haven’t been already. Plants in general need at least 3 to 4 hours of direct sun in order to flower. They love mulch, fertilizer and water. Some varieties such as Vietnamese Jaina, Purple Haze, Physical Graffiti, Natural Mystic, Haley’s Comet, Dark Star, American Beauty, etc. are self-fertile. However, many varieties require hand pollination to increase fruit set and fruit size. They do very well on palm trees, branching, hanging down and fruiting as they climb,. They do best on palms which naturally shed their frounds which prevents them from climbing over the crown. I however grow my Vietnamese Jaina on a post set 2 feet into the ground with a small wooden frame 2 to 3 feet from the ground. They should be pushed with fertilizer and mulch until they get to the top of whatever they are growing on. Do not use herbicides any near Dragon Fruit plants, but being a cactus they are very drought tolerant and once established require little care. To see pictures of Dragon Fruit, go to http://www.mauidragonfruit.com/ or http://www.tradewindsfruit.com/dragon_fruit.htm

PROPOGATION:

The dragon fruit plant can grow easily from vine cuttings. Plant the vine in good potting soil only 1 to 2 inch deep. Water once every two week and let the soil dry up. With filtered sunlight and warm temperature, the vine will grow root first. Once the root is established, new vines will sprout from the nodes.

FOOD VALUE OF DRAGON FRUIT:

One dragonfruit can weigh between 150 and 600g, but with its thick covering, only about 60 percent is edible. To enjoy dragonfruits, it is best to eat the creamy pulp cold. The middle part is the sweetest, and after cutting the fruits in half, you just have to spoon the flesh out. Dragonfruits are common in Asia (particularly in Taiwan, Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines) and in Central and South America. They are among the many wonder fruits that are said to provide multiple health benefits. In addition, dragonfruits help protect the environment because they absorb carbon dioxide at nighttime, and then release oxygen to purify the air.

Calories,
If you are looking for fruits that are filling and delicious, but will help keep your weight in check, dragonfruits are a perfect choice. A 100g serving of dragonfruit has only 60 calories: 18 calories from fat (all unsaturated), 8 calories from protein and 34 calories from carbohydrates. Dragonfruits do not have complex carbohydrates, so they can be easily broken down by the body.

Fats and Cholesterol,
Dragonfruits do not contain cholesterol, saturated fat and trans fat, so regular consumption will help manage your blood pressure and control your cholesterol levels. The seeds of dragonfruits are high in polyunsaturated fatty acids (omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids) that reduce triglycerides and lower the risk of cardiovascular disorder.

Fiber,
Dragonfruits are high in fiber, so regular consumption can help avoid constipation, improve your digestive health and help you reduce weight.

Vitamins and Minerals,
Dragonfruits are rich in vitamin C, containing 9mg per serving that is equivalent to 10 percent of the daily value. Thus, eating dragonfruits helps strengthen your immune system and promotes faster healing of bruises and wounds. In fact, regular eating of dragonfruits will help ward off chronic respiratory disorders such as asthma and cough. Dragonfruits also contain B vitamins such as B1 for better carbohydrate metabolism, B2 for recovery and improvement of appetite, and B3 for reducing bad cholesterol while improving the skin condition.

Dragonfruits are also packed with minerals such as calcium for stronger bones and teeth, phosphorus for tissue formation and iron for healthy blood. One dragonfruit contains approximately 8.8g of calcium, 36.1mg of phosphorus and 0.65mg of iron.

Phytoalbumins,
Dragonfruits contain phytoalbumins, which have antioxidant properties that help prevent the formation of cancer cells. In addition, dragonfruits are also known to increase the excretion of heavy metal toxins from the body.

Lycopene,
Lycopene is also present in dragonfruits, and this is the pigment responsible for their red color. Lycopene is said to prevent prostate cancer. [source - retrieved from http://www.fitday.com/fitness-articles/nutrition/healthy-eating/the-nutritional-value-of-dragonfruit.html on 12/02/2012]

Vernacular names of Hylocereus
These fruits are commonly known as "dragon fruit" as in the Chinese hu? lóng gu?, "fire dragon fruit", and lóng zh? gu?, "dragon pearl fruit". The Vietnamese thanh long meaning "green dragon", the Indonesian and Malaysian buah naga, the Lao mark mang gohn, and the Thai kaeo mangkon or "dragon crystal". Other vernacular names are strawberry pear or nanettika fruit. [source - retrieved from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pitaya on 12/02/2012]
As can be readily seen, Dragon Fruit is a wonderful gift from Almighty God (YHWH).

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